I’m Thinking Non Registered Mini Milk Cow

“I’m thinking a mini milk cow that is unregistered and little less expensive would be best for my husband and I for our first milking cow.  Do you have any available?” KIM

You know Kim, there should be little difference between a “well bred” cross (or composite) cow and a well bred Full Blood cow. This could be the case IF you know the history of the parental line and that the animals have been selected, over time, for those certain characteristics that everyone will want.

There is a reason that we have customers all across America, in Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, and the Philippines . . . we are Seed Stock Producers that have been selecting for the following traits and practices since 1999:

  • We treat our cows “tougher” than you treat your cows. Although treated with very low stress Animal Welfare, our bulls and cows are on pasture 365, rain or shine, snow or egg frying hot.
  • We develop the bulls  and cows on forage – with nothing but hay, salt, minerals, and North Sea Seaweed as  supplements.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for disposition from calf-hood to sell point.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for feet and leg conformation, which is an indicator of tenderness and ease of fleshing.
  • We evaluate and score bulls for preputial (Penis Sheath) prolapse problems.
  • Provide an udder score for the bulls and all females that we sell.
  • Provide a One-Year Guarantee on the bulls that we sell.
  • We guarantee our bulls for calving ease, by Live Cover or their Frozen Semen.
  • We guarantee each bull and cow sold to be free from genetic defects.
  • We control flies and other parasites with our genetics – instead of chemicals.
  • We invite customers and the general public to participate in bull, cow and heifer evaluation (Farm Day.)
  • We provide “bend over backwards” service to our customers before and after the sell.

Falster Farm on Pasture 365™  has spent the last 18+ years producing low-maintenance cattle that can increase pleasure, pounds and profit per acre in every environment they have been placed. We have developed our genetics and herd size by utilizing hard core selection processes and “cutting edge” technology to restore the tried and true heritage genetics that make beef and milk great. Specifically, we use Artificial Insemination to time when a cow conceives and delivers (cosmic optimization), and embryo transplants (ET) from our most desirable mamma cows; placing them into a herd of cows that are of the same stature, just not registered(able).

Our success rate is between 75%-80%, some 30% better than the average effort, and we are thankful to God for this. Since not every AI or ET effort is successful, a Live Cover follow-up bull is placed on the whole herd and observed as to whom he gives his attention. The resultant offspring of the Herd Sire and the Recip cow give us a composite we originally called a “Hersey”, since we used old world size Jersey cows in our first years of this kinda herd development work.

(B)y following the directions of M. Guenon, as laid down in the treatise, anyone can tell with certainty whether a cow is a good milker, or whether a heifer will become one, so that there need be no doubt as to the profit of raising an animal, and no chance of being taken in the purchase of one.”
— National tribute of the French Government Paris, September 17, 1848. This quotation is from the first page of the 14th edition of A Treatise on Milch Cows by M. Francois Guenon.

I hope you will profit from my short missive and see what the Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ program delivers our customers.

Non Registered Heifer 1607
Side View of Non Registered Heifer 1607.

At left is a dual purpose 1st time heifer with outstanding Mini Cow attributes. Her Top Line is flat with a long and wide pelvic area, yielding ease of calving on the female side. If you notice the darker shading along the bottom of her barrel: that is hair that lies with growth going up, while the top hair is growing down. Known as the pancreatic hair whorl, the presence and density of this feature assures the buyer that this heifer has a high level of genetic potential for positive reproductive capacity. Her lower (bottom) line is nearly flat toward the front (Brisket.) This indicates full lung development and lots of room for well developed rumen and organs. Note her legs are feminine and set wide apart.

Non Registered Heifer 1607

Now, let’s now look at her rear end. These photos were taken of her just entering Falster’s corrals, with no touch ups. Notice her tail, how it hangs clean and clear of the vulva. She will be an easy breeding cow, with lots of size in her pelvis and flank. We can’t see her udder but it is as correct as one could wish, tight and high. Her tail set is clean and straight off the top allowing for ease of calf delivery.

So, here is the why in what I see in this heifer:
Her neck is moderately long, which is an indicator of growth; she is clean and trim in the throat area; her loin and rump show to be long, wide, and level causing the animal to be long strong and flat in her back;
Extremely short-bodied and short- legged cattle are associated with excessive fat deposition and inefficient growth rates; Long-legged and long-bodied cattle are associated with late maturity and low-quality grades. This heifer is well proportioned.
She is of a dual purpose nature, so her round of beef should be deep and wide when viewed from the rear, with the widest portion being about midway between the tail head and hock;
The shoulder should be and is well-muscled, but free of coarseness; offspring with extremely heavy, open shoulders can cause calving difficulties, which none of her ancestry exhibits;
A beefy milking animal should be moderately trim in its rear flank, underline, and brisket, and carry minimal excessive waste; at the same time, the animal should show good depth of body, indicating body capacity and overall productiveness.
She has a wide, full heart girth, adequate spring of the fore-ribs, and a wide chest floor and chest indicating proper growth and function of her vital organs; an adequate width between front and hind legs also indicating good body capacity and muscling.
She has soundness of Feet and Legs. Visual appraisal of structural soundness is useful in evaluating longevity and productivity. For cattle to travel and remain sound during long productive lives, they must have correct conformation of feet and legs.

As a cow, this animal will deliver rich milk for her owner, enough to feed the human family and carry her calf as well. I expect you can see that her offspring of a bull calf will be productive as a beef steer and a heifer will develop similar traits as she. Falster Farm has the capacity to supply her genetics with credible predictability most anywhere on earth.

Now, she is for sale, and several others as well – as of this posting. Thank you for your interest, now you know to judge a cow for tenderness, longevity and reproductive capacity.

NOTES: I’m beholding to Kit Pharo of Pharo Cattle Company for codifying the points of selection of a good bull and adding the observation about the preputial in many breeding animals. Gerald Fry and Steve Campbell really opened my eyes to a more natural way to predict to genetic development in cattle through their referral of the “Milch Cow” that so wonderfully gives us signs and proportions of the well balanced milk and beef cow.