I’m Thinking Non Registered Mini Milk Cow

“I’m thinking a mini milk cow that is unregistered and little less expensive would be best for my husband and I for our first milking cow.  Do you have any available?” KIM

You know Kim, there should be little difference between a “well bred” cross (or composite) cow and a well bred Full Blood cow. This could be the case IF you know the history of the parental line and that the animals have been selected, over time, for those certain characteristics that everyone will want.

There is a reason that we have customers all across America, in Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, and the Philippines . . . we are Seed Stock Producers that have been selecting for the following traits and practices since 1999:

  • We treat our cows “tougher” than you treat your cows. Although treated with very low stress Animal Welfare, our bulls and cows are on pasture 365, rain or shine, snow or egg frying hot.
  • We develop the bulls  and cows on forage – with nothing but hay, salt, minerals, and North Sea Seaweed as  supplements.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for disposition from calf-hood to sell point.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for feet and leg conformation, which is an indicator of tenderness and ease of fleshing.
  • We evaluate and score bulls for preputial (Penis Sheath) prolapse problems.
  • Provide an udder score for the bulls and all females that we sell.
  • Provide a One-Year Guarantee on the bulls that we sell.
  • We guarantee our bulls for calving ease, by Live Cover or their Frozen Semen.
  • We guarantee each bull and cow sold to be free from genetic defects.
  • We control flies and other parasites with our genetics – instead of chemicals.
  • We invite customers and the general public to participate in bull, cow and heifer evaluation (Farm Day.)
  • We provide “bend over backwards” service to our customers before and after the sell.

Falster Farm on Pasture 365™  has spent the last 18+ years producing low-maintenance cattle that can increase pleasure, pounds and profit per acre in every environment they have been placed. We have developed our genetics and herd size by utilizing hard core selection processes and “cutting edge” technology to restore the tried and true heritage genetics that make beef and milk great. Specifically, we use Artificial Insemination to time when a cow conceives and delivers (cosmic optimization), and embryo transplants (ET) from our most desirable mamma cows; placing them into a herd of cows that are of the same stature, just not registered(able).

Our success rate is between 75%-80%, some 30% better than the average effort, and we are thankful to God for this. Since not every AI or ET effort is successful, a Live Cover follow-up bull is placed on the whole herd and observed as to whom he gives his attention. The resultant offspring of the Herd Sire and the Recip cow give us a composite we originally called a “Hersey”, since we used old world size Jersey cows in our first years of this kinda herd development work.

(B)y following the directions of M. Guenon, as laid down in the treatise, anyone can tell with certainty whether a cow is a good milker, or whether a heifer will become one, so that there need be no doubt as to the profit of raising an animal, and no chance of being taken in the purchase of one.”
— National tribute of the French Government Paris, September 17, 1848. This quotation is from the first page of the 14th edition of A Treatise on Milch Cows by M. Francois Guenon.

I hope you will profit from my short missive and see what the Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ program delivers our customers.

Non Registered Heifer 1607
Side View of Non Registered Heifer 1607.

At left is a dual purpose 1st time heifer with outstanding Mini Cow attributes. Her Top Line is flat with a long and wide pelvic area, yielding ease of calving on the female side. If you notice the darker shading along the bottom of her barrel: that is hair that lies with growth going up, while the top hair is growing down. Known as the pancreatic hair whorl, the presence and density of this feature assures the buyer that this heifer has a high level of genetic potential for positive reproductive capacity. Her lower (bottom) line is nearly flat toward the front (Brisket.) This indicates full lung development and lots of room for well developed rumen and organs. Note her legs are feminine and set wide apart.

Non Registered Heifer 1607

Now, let’s now look at her rear end. These photos were taken of her just entering Falster’s corrals, with no touch ups. Notice her tail, how it hangs clean and clear of the vulva. She will be an easy breeding cow, with lots of size in her pelvis and flank. We can’t see her udder but it is as correct as one could wish, tight and high. Her tail set is clean and straight off the top allowing for ease of calf delivery.

So, here is the why in what I see in this heifer:
Her neck is moderately long, which is an indicator of growth; she is clean and trim in the throat area; her loin and rump show to be long, wide, and level causing the animal to be long strong and flat in her back;
Extremely short-bodied and short- legged cattle are associated with excessive fat deposition and inefficient growth rates; Long-legged and long-bodied cattle are associated with late maturity and low-quality grades. This heifer is well proportioned.
She is of a dual purpose nature, so her round of beef should be deep and wide when viewed from the rear, with the widest portion being about midway between the tail head and hock;
The shoulder should be and is well-muscled, but free of coarseness; offspring with extremely heavy, open shoulders can cause calving difficulties, which none of her ancestry exhibits;
A beefy milking animal should be moderately trim in its rear flank, underline, and brisket, and carry minimal excessive waste; at the same time, the animal should show good depth of body, indicating body capacity and overall productiveness.
She has a wide, full heart girth, adequate spring of the fore-ribs, and a wide chest floor and chest indicating proper growth and function of her vital organs; an adequate width between front and hind legs also indicating good body capacity and muscling.
She has soundness of Feet and Legs. Visual appraisal of structural soundness is useful in evaluating longevity and productivity. For cattle to travel and remain sound during long productive lives, they must have correct conformation of feet and legs.

As a cow, this animal will deliver rich milk for her owner, enough to feed the human family and carry her calf as well. I expect you can see that her offspring of a bull calf will be productive as a beef steer and a heifer will develop similar traits as she. Falster Farm has the capacity to supply her genetics with credible predictability most anywhere on earth.

Now, she is for sale, and several others as well – as of this posting. Thank you for your interest, now you know to judge a cow for tenderness, longevity and reproductive capacity.

NOTES: I’m beholding to Kit Pharo of Pharo Cattle Company for codifying the points of selection of a good bull and adding the observation about the preputial in many breeding animals. Gerald Fry and Steve Campbell really opened my eyes to a more natural way to predict to genetic development in cattle through their referral of the “Milch Cow” that so wonderfully gives us signs and proportions of the well balanced milk and beef cow.

Falster Farm A2A2 Beef Primal Cuts

Lets Review, there three components that make flavorful tender beef:

60% is GENETICS, 30% is the FARMING PRACTICE, and 10% is ANIMAL HANDLING in the final 24 hours before slaughter.You now know more than 99% of the buying public, including the big on-line marketers of beef.

Tender and Flavorful, the Classic Hereford Steer and Angus are our delights.

Get a Quote From Falster Farm

So, let’s discuss the cuts of beef selection possibilities for your beeve.

Once the beeve is humanly dispatched it is cleaned and hangs in the chiller for a number of days. At our local USDA inspected abattoir in Mineola, Texas it may be as: Fresh, as few as 7 days, on average 10 days, and on special occasions 21 days. 

The carcass is allowed to rest in very carefully controlled conditions (cool temperatures, with relatively high humidity) for a period of time—occasionally several weeks.

Under such conditions, we allow enzymes to do their work inside the meat. Results are that we end up with a complexity of flavor — that just wasn’t there before. This increases the nutrient density and frankly, there’s no cooking method that can generate the depth of flavor of an aged piece of meat.

What happens is that enzymes in the meat’s muscle cells begin to break down the meat’s proteins, fats, and glycogen—a carbohydrate—into amino acids, fatty acids, and sugars. One amino acid generated by dry-aging—the most important and flavorful one, in fact—is glutamate.

Then the carcass is ready to cut into divisions of “Cuts” — in our discussion we are looking at the Eight (8) “Primal Cuts of a beef”.

Here we see the interior of the carcass cut into the 8 traditional butcher cuts.

However the Primals can be further subdivided into Specialty Primals as shown here:

Primal beef cuts.

The Chuck: 1 and 2 is about 25% — The Rib: 3 is about 9% — The Loin:4 is about 19% — The Short Loin: 5 — The Rump: 6 is about 4% — The Round: 7 is about 24% — The Brisket: 8 is about 4% — The Plate: 9 is about 7% — The Flank: 10 is about 5% — The Front Shank: 11 is about 3%, The Hind Shank: 12 — is about 3%.

Now our carcass is ready to be further subdivided into “Retail Cuts”:

Still doing it the Old Way – Hand carved.

After we have the Primal Cuts of a beef, which are generally cut by knives and meat saw, we will further cut and scrape to the specification of the customer’s desired thickness and weight.

Hand Cut and using a band saw to make “Retail Cuts.”

This is accomplished using the band saw and a hand scraper.

In our Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ Falling Star beef brand beef, every attention is given to perfection.We recommend 1.5 to 2 inch steaks for best size to choose. At Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ the thickness of our Grass Raised and Clover Finished steak is not just about portion control. Without an adequately thick steak, it’s very difficult to get that perfect contrast between “exterior firm” and interior “melt in your mouth” goodness. Very thin steaks will tend to overcook before they can finish developing a nice crust, even over the hottest fire you can build. Using a thicker steak will help you maintain more of that perfectly cooked interior during the searing process.
This does mean that each steak ends up weighing between 12 ounces and a pound—that’s big, even for someone with a healthy appetite for red meat. But remember this: It’s better to cook one large steak for every two people than to cook two smaller steaks. Learn how to share.

One of the things that makes Falster Farm so different is that we oversee the process assuring our customer that:

  1. They get their meat that we delivered for them to the abattoir, and
  2. We are small enough to offer flexibility in all facets of the breeding, rearing, finishing and processing of a truly gourmet cut of beef.

What do I look for in a herd bull . . . ?

111515_1507_ForSaleFals2.pngI believe that many breeders make the mistake of thinking that every bull calf born out of good parents will make a quality herd sire. That swapping their bull calf for another’s bull calf will fix or ensure genetic diversity. Make no mistake about it; there are a lot of other characteristics to consider when choosing a prospective herd sire than just having a different bull. Falster Farm doesn’t select our Mini Bull herd sires on their draw in show ring or if someone will trade us their bull calf for one of ours. After the show ring, most animals are unfit for real ranch and a farm breeding life, not by genetics necessarily, but by rearing on high powered forced gains by grain! Fact: he will be short lived, short winded, and if taken off grain, a serious loss of virility ensues. Same for the female show cow. Show animals are a great way to downgrade your herd’s virility and sustainability (proven in my experience.)

Let’s Look um Over . . . What should you look for?

First place to look: A Breeders Reputation is the basis of our cattle ranching heritage. It’s your 1st assurance of quality, and ethics of the breeder, you should consider his guarantees – if any. The STUD BOOK of any registry is only reliable if the governing membership enforces the rules of the organization, and the members adhere

America's #1 Pasture Monthly.
Falster featured in America’s #1 Pasture Monthly.

to those standards. Now, I’m going to make a course statement in a minute about show cattle but it wasn’t always a case of grain fed stock vs. pature finished beef as the driving force for the associations. Be that as it may, the breed association is the basis for the quality and reliability of the pure bred seed stock.

Disposition is a very important trait that I look for. Ninety-nine percent of the time, if the mother cow has a good disposition, so will the calf. I won’t even consider a calf for a herd sire if he is constantly bouncing off the fence and

Horn Weights
Buyers looking over Horn Weights on yearling Mini Hereford Bull KNF CIBOLO

trying to crawl under the gate every time he is brought into the corral pens. Besides that, his mother won’t stay long with that kind of attitude (thus the importance of data base selection records.) My Herd Bulls are not to be feared, but, respected and enjoyed. Even though they are short (just tipping the end of the ear), I train the horns to curve down, they are powerful animals, and they must to have a good disposition. Again, disposition is bred into an animal and is a very important trait when choosing a herd sire prospect. If you can’t work with him, he can hurt you and your stock.

Masculine traits are very important. I want a bull calf that looks like a bull calf and acts like a bull calf. I want to look in his face and know I am looking at a bull. As I observe him out in the pasture, I want to see him following after cows that are in heat. I want to see him butting heads with other calves and

Mini Bull Yearling PRINCE RUPERT
Yearling Mini Bull PRINCE RUPERT

generally acting like a young boy. It’s just like watching boys grow up. They are rolling around, getting dirty, and acting tough and chasing girls even though at the time they wouldn’t know what to do if they caught one. These are early masculine traits that can be observed and noted at an early age. They must be there if he is to be a working Herd Bull. AND here’s one reason why: I’ve had more than one big Brangus bull jump over our fence and try to breed a miniature cow in heat. The herd bull must protect / defend his herd from intruders as well as service them. This is a must with me. I’ve had my bull Dagmar hold off three different bulls over a three year period . . . once he went two days sparing with a Beef Master before I knew the brute was in our pasture. Dagmar’s face was looking like a beaten prize fighter but his momma cows were not damaged, and he healed up soon enough. His get are with us today, and we love um. The winners are seed stock, the loosers taste great. Both have the very best life that can be had living on the land with excellent pasyurage and clean water and minerals.

Physical Conformation too; a good disposition, masculine traits, and a good sire and dam are things you would want in a herd sire prospect of any breed. When I look for a Miniature Registered Hereford or Mini Jersey herd sire prospect, I look for the traits that made our cattle what they are. An overall view of this calf would show me a clean underline with a tight sheath and navel. The testicular development would be normal and adequate with both testicles down and of equal size. A straight top line, adequate length, beefy broad hips, but not overly muscled, small to medium ears and showing good horn growth for his age. I want to see a calf that is healthy and his general appearance is attractive. I’m looking for length of loin and a medium and balanced skeletal structure. A youngster < 14 months will not have the big neck, but the hair should show curly density and the scrotal sac should too. An 18 month old prospect should be showing size in the neck and very curly neck and forehead hair. His sack should look like a ping pong paddle when viewed from the rear. The older he gets the more distance from the body (heat) it should descend. 

From conception to birth and from weaning to yearling, he is a herd sire prospect. But, somewhere along the way, I have to make a decision. Do I have a bull that represents the Miniature Hereford or Jersey breed of cattle and can he pass on the traditional traits to future generations? Is he going to fulfill the breeding plan of our Falster farm? Do I like him? Does my wife want to keep him? Her sense of judgment is very intuitive and I rely on it to “feel” things that are relationship orientated, feelings that I often over look.

My grandpa taught me that the bull was ½ the value of the entire herd. I won’t tell you that story here, but; I’ve learned to be very critical when it comes to choosing herd sire prospects. Unless a bull calf surpasses his sire, that bull ought to be in a pet steer or on some discriminating dining table. A quality herd sire is an expensive, but the most important investment you can make in the cattle business. Anytime you breed undesirable traits you are multiplying those bad traits many times over and polluting future generations. One year of poorly selected breeding can take several years to correct.

Using these guidelines, I, and you will have chosen consistently excellent herd sire prospects. I will closely observe him through weaning and on to breeding age. He will be weighed at weaning and at yearling age. His scrotal measurements will be taken and recorded. At breeding age he will he bred to a good set of heifers, and his production record will have begun. Hopefully, I have made the right choice, and I will have a great Miniature Hereford herd sire.

Karl Emmett Falster, Sr.

Capt. Karl is a lifelong student of Southern Agricultural principals of small family farm sustainability. He and his wife Nancy own and farm Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ in Wood County Texas. He reguarly does consultation services. A former United States Marine, Falster is the CEO of a non-profit organization that teaches Veterans to Farm: WARRIORS THAT FARM®

Mini Cattle with a Dual Purpose

In the development of the Falster Farm mini cattle herd, we found that we wanted to make available a more dual purpose breed (from our existing stock) and prove that the breeding our pure bred Mini Hereford Herd Sire(s) on ANY cow would generate:

Mini Cattle of a Dual Purpose Nature from Falster Farm
Mini Cattle of a Dual Purpose Nature from Falster Farm CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE SLIDES

 

 

 

 

 

 

•A more Thrifty Cow,
•A greater possibility for beef on an otherwise rangy carcuss, and
•Possibly sweeter milk (higher butter fat) on an otherwise hard to mike cow
•A real friendly attractive cow, easy to love

So take a look at this short presentation on Falster Farm’s CERTIFED WHOLISTIC efforts — if you like what you see, would you please leave a comment, rate, or like it?

Lesser Jersey SHOTZIE

Shown here: It’s a 30 lbs. heifer born to SHOTZE the mini Jersey Cow on 25 SEP 2015.Mini Jersey SHOTZIE collage

For Sale $5000 SHOTZIE is a beautiful young proven Mid Size (Lesser Jersey) mama cow born on Falster Farm, 27 JAN 2012. She has been on lush pasturage all her life. 45” tall at the hip, she is milked easily by hand and or machine. Her 1st calf (2014) was a heifer (1445 HEART HEAD) that has passed the selection process and is available as a pasture exposed virgin heifer now. SHOTZIE has given us another heifer calf on the ground (KNF ROSIE) now under our observation of growth and development.

SHOTZIE is the daughter of the KNF BENNETT ORLANDO our former Mini Jersey Herd Sire that sold to certified dairy in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, to down size a dairy herd there, and the beautiful Mini Jersey TRACY KATHRINE. Both parents are registered with the American Miniature Jersey Association of Nebraska.

SHOTZIE with 2015 heifer calf ROSIE
SHOTZIE with 2015 heifer calf ROSIE

The observations of SHOTZIE over her months of development are that she is an upper mid herd member of the dairy herd, ranked #3 in the pecking order in our herd of 7. She is an experienced and excellent mothering cow with good milk and longevity of milking. She strongly prefers to be in the herd and not alone, therefore it is recommended she be purchased with her offspring or added to an existing herd of cattle. She should readily fit in and flourish.

 

The Homestead Cow

The Family Cow Development

Most of the customers that come to Falster Farm are looking for a cow that they can work with in the development of their own small  – family farm. Sustainability is a aspect of their desire although often subliminal. At the turn of the century we started developing the Hersey Line of cross bred cows: Jersey Cow bred by a Mini Hereford Bull.

The project has come into bloom now and we have a enough calves on the ground in the 3rd generation to get a look at what the effect will be:

If you are looking for a dual purpose breed these charming mid size to mini cows may be your answer.
Perhaps if you have a question I could answer it in another Post. Ask away my friend.

Milk Fed Pig Report “Cochon de lait cru”

Along with the scientific and experiential fact that raw milk is an excellent health food for my family, I’ve also been using raw milk (JERSEY GIRLS dairy in Winnsboro Texas) to supplement our pig’s all-natural diet (“Cochon de lait cru”.) The cow is a ruminant animal, and as such converters grasses and fobs into a healthy meat and milk. Paris Reidhead in an exhaustive article titled CLA’s and Omega 3’s: Pastured Health Benefits Passed to Humans confirms and states succinctly what I (and our customers) have experienced over the last several years.

Milk from Grass Fed Cows has Hidden Benefits

Until recently, all of the experiments demonstrating the cancer – fighting properties of CLA have used SYNTHETIC CLA. To see whether the CLA that occurs naturally in cow’s milk has similar cancer – fighting properties, researchers recently compared the two. They fed one group of rats butter that was high in CLA (from raw cow’s milk) and fed another group of rats an equivalent amount of synthetic CLA. As one would expect, the natural CLA proved to be just as effective in blocking tumor growth as the man – made variety. (In both cases, cancer yield was reduced by about 50%.)

However, the rats eating the butter accumulated even more CLA in their tissues than the rats fed an equivalent amount of synthetic CLA. Researchers believe that the rats were converting another “good” fat found in the butter, trans-vaccenic acid or TVA, into CLA, providing a second helping of this cancer fighting fat.

So, here at Falster Farm, along with raising our pigs out in the pasture (I mean grass and clover fields – not a dirt lot) we also feed them grass fed raw dairy: milk, cheeses, whey, and yogurt, all of which is naturally rich in CLA’s and Omega 3’s plus other nutrients like lycine which pigs need as well as Vitamin A ( which only comes from animal sources by the way). We feed only Non-Soy, Non-GMO, Non-Medicated feed, rather, we feed all-natural peanut/forage based feed from TEXAS NATURAL FEED.

Traditionally pork raised in this manner by the French and Italian all-natural farmers is called “Cochon de lait cru” and stands alone from most other pork on the market in terms of delicate taste and supreme nutritional and health value.

Here we see one of Falster’s Red Wattle Sows with her Cochon de lait cru piglets coming in from the pastures to feed on raw dairy we collect from Jersey Girls dairy twice a week. The ducks along with the guineas hens are companions that eat up the insects and any other pest or parasite on the place. The pigs reciprocate by keeping the raccoon, possum and coyote bay.

As our many farm visitors attest, it’s a lovely and fascinating site to see the interaction of all the different species of animals. Because of this working relationship there are no flies to speak of and no smell of fecal matter or urine. The soil borne biological creatures literally consume the waste, converting it into rich beneficial humic-matter.

Over the Summer of 2013 we had 5 Interns from different parts of France it was a pleasant surprise to learn that what I thought was a new, if not novel idea of my grandmothers feeding her pigs milk was a gourmet practice in certain parts of France and Italy.  

In our opinion, this division of our farm is the very epitome of a sustainable agriculture.

Making a Pig & Pork Difference

The buying public seldom gets to meet the farmer of his food, and even more seldom have the opportunity of seeing the rearing conditions/environment his food is being reared in. The Falsters and their allied local farmer’s do all they can to encourage contact between the buying public and our species and produce; so they can see and enjoy the bio-diversity that promotes good health and great tastes.

In the rearing of Falling Star Brand pork the visiting customer can see our efforts at ensuring optimal living conditions for our animals. The scene below shows our young pigs being nourished on sweet grasses and red and white clovers on our Post Oak Savannah pastures. The pond affords lounging areas topped with shade provided by oak and sweet gum trees.

pig 1
Raw Milk Feeder for Falling Star Pigs

When consumers buy grocery store pork, they can be assured that that pork is nothing what so ever like Falster Farm’s Falling Star Brand pork. What is impressive about Falling Star Brand pigs is their gourmet taste, the result of feeding a special diet.

Factory Farms, are so unhealthy that their pigs must receive regular does of anti-biotic medications and growth hormones, which I believe are passed on to the consumer despite government approved labeling (who in their right mind can trust the government?) These big farms domicile the pig in a cage so small that the animal can hardly turn around, in an enclosed barn that stifles the olfactory.

Many Local Farms often feed large amounts of “good left over’s” and waste such as two day old bread store throw-away as well as GMO corn and wheat shorts on dirt lots.

Now, people who buy animal meat reared like this are free to do so. Bless there their hearts they have unconsciously made a decision to put their money into prescription drugs rather than quality food. Yes, we are what we eat, and eating meat is primal to the human need but eating cheap factory food is anti-primal, it is a major source contributing to the national obesity and health dysfunction.

Recognizing this, Nancy and I made the decision to rear a much better meat for our family and all those that are of like mind and consideration. Yes that means we are not feeding the world cheap nutrient worthless food. The Falster pork rearing protocol is almost unique. Read More about how we do it.

Nancy and I share this process with folks from around the world that come to intern on Falster Farm. These interns are mostly involved in the World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms – WWOOF. It is an expense for us but we believe that the real hope for the planet isn’t some crap about a corporation doing “green” things; rather, real people learning and living how to implement sustainable farming practices that work in the real world, not on the TV advertisements.

 

 

 

Surprise, Surprise

There is a notion in reformed theology that a good cattleman is “thinking God’s thoughts after him.” And today was one of them – only it was a good cattlewoman: Nancy Gail Falster.

Spot trailing along web
On the Mini Cattle Trail

Nancy volunteered to come help me deliver and set up the big stock trailer so as to get the herd there at the Simonds Place accustomed to coming into the corral, passing by it and not hang back; so we could catch them up for moving back to Falster Farm. We drove in and I swung around, backed up, got the measurements fixed, disconnected pulled away 50-70 feet and I indicated for Nancy to start calling them up to the dairy feed she sprinkled in the feed bunkers.

To my surprise they all, except for one baby, dashed right by the trailer and into the corrals. Astonished I told Nancy to let that baby’s mama out and close the gate. Without asking way, she did it and we quickly fixed the gate to the load up end of the stock trailer. Then up comes one mama who had her calf in the catch pen, but she had lagged behind! So we had two mamas and one baby outside. No problem, we can come back and get um, I’m thinking.

Soon I attempted to pressure then into the trailer, they just went up, balked, turned back. After several attempts, Nancy said, “just watch this.” She jumped out of the corral and fetched the remaining 5 gal bucket of ration, grabbed up a feed trough – pulling it to the front of the 30′ trailer, poured ½ bucket in there, came off, snatched up one of them big ole green bushy weeds – tearing it right out of the ground – and started to whacking and yelling at those cows to load up. Surprised, they started to jump in – all but the bulls. I jumped up behind them, closed the inner doors, and commenced to pressure the bulls to load –up too. Seeing that the two of us was determine to take the cows, they jumped on board too. I closed the rear gate and we had them! Surprise, surprise! Everybody was surprised!

Nancy figured the mama (with the baby on board) would follow the trailer home, and she did. With Nancy riding on the tail end of the trailer that mama hung right in there as we slowly eased on back to the Falster corrals. The other mama followed her calf off into the woods – I’ll get her next time I hope.

I am rearranging the herds into breeding groups for 2014 Spring calves.  Cibolo and his Herd will replace Stan and Rupert there on the Simonds place. Rupert will be getting his own herd now and occupy the King Place. Of course Stan will get a few more to service in his herd this year, but I’ll keep him close, here on Falster..

Sharing the Falster’s Farm Table

Sharing is Farm Caring – Sustainable Farming at its core.

Visitors to our Sustainable Farm in East Texas will frequently set at our dining room table. Of course we share our meals, planning session, entertain prospective buyers of our mini cattle, gourmet beef, gourmet pork and poultry – all raised on pasture and most of them finished on clover at our table .  .  . Folks get to know their farmer in no better way.

When we set down together, our visitors are impressed by the uniqueness of the table top – it is covered with paintings of our most beloved animals from the past:

buyers - consultationThis Canadian couple came to partake of our On-Farm-Consulting Services. Our Bio-Dynamic farming practices attract folks from all over the country and numerous visitors on the WWOOF program. Here is a good view of our table depicting several of our animal friends. Animal welfare is a big component of our farm/ranch. Our mini Hereford beef cattle, mini Jersey dairy cows, pigs, chickens and ducks, are all treated with respect and live in as low stress environment as can possibly be provided.

On our table or board we can see our Coat of Arms center stage, and each place has a painting of one of our beloved animal friends (personalities) of past years.

 My Current Falster Coat of Arms:

In the center of the table is the Farmer Falster version of my family coat of arms – the Ancient Arms of Falster as we know it is the gold chevrons below the lion in red.

Table Falster Coat of Arms
The Warrior Farmer Falster Coat of Arms

Now, in heraldry the custom was to treat/make a depiction of a man’s honor in battle on a emblazoned crest or shied – a standard.

In my personal life history: After serving in combat in Viet Nam as a US Marine (Scout Warrior with 1/!), awarded several medals for valor, I started a franchise company called Falster Knives – thus the sword.

My people come from a Danish Island named Falster Island – thus the Viking Helm.

Our efforts at farming here in Texas respect the values of the past in order to preserve the prospects of the future – thus the Valhalla type style in the lettering.

Let’s look now at those animals we honor on this broad board:

Table Falster - Paint Horse KNF FOLGER
FOLGER – One Hot Cup of Coffee under saddle

Falster’s Paint Cow Pony FOLGER:

FOLGER and his ½ brother RAZ-MA-TAZ served as my cow horses and saddle mount in reenactment parades around South Texas for many years. FOLGER is a two blue eyed registered paint gelding. He is Nancy’s horse and wants to do more work than we have for him to do now.

I say that because of the injuries I have to my bones and joins over the years of rough cowboy work on the farm.

To offset that loss of flexibility, we tried to find a suitable working dog. that would afford good companion as well as herding style.

Table Falster American Farm Collie BELL
American Farm Collie BELL

The most beautiful dog to possess those attributes was our American Farm Collie – BELLE.

Willie has put in a good day's work
Border Collie KNF WILFORD von FALSTER “Willie”

She was everything one could want in a slow moving working dog, including a loving and respectful family dog. Like RAZ-MA-TAZ she has gone on to be with the Creator, and we have her replacement with us today: KNF WOLFORD VON FALSTER – our pure blood Border Collie “Willie” shown here resting after a hard day’s work herding cows out to their Summer quarters. He is assertive almost beyond compare and lives to be at my side, or on a long outreach to fetch up our mini cattle, pigs, chickens, ducks or any thing I send him to fetch..

So what are these cows that need herding?

At the Master’s end of the table resides a portrait of the world renowned miniature Hereford herd sire KNF CIBOLO.

Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO
Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO

At my Ladies end of the board sets Nancy Gail Faster and her place s held by very 1st dairy cow and the foundation of our mini Jersey dairy line – her name was ANNAKNF ANNE.

ANNA was the most theatrical cow one could ever meet. There simply is not enough space in this missive to tell all the tails that come to mind with most of these creatures, but ANNA is perhaps to most cunning, and comical of the lot.

Of course we have had goats, and lots of them of several wonderful breeds but the smartest and most charming was a cross between a Lamancha and a Pigmy Goat – named Bar-B-Que. BARBE was a show goat – not a powder puff show goat but a showboat show goat that loved to travel – especially to the “old folks” homes around San Antonio.

Pigmy Goat "BAR B QUE"
Pigmy Goat “BAR B QUE”

On the farm Barbie was a rough and tumble little fella trying to hold his own amongst a large company of larger animals.

But upon entering the foyer of a building he became the persona of a gentleman goat. Riding up and down the elevator, waiting respectfully outside the patient’s room, jumping up on their bed when called – you name it, that goat could do it!

Gustav the Barn Cat
The Lion at Falster Farm – Miss Col. Gustav Hoffman

Well Now, what farm would be complete without a dynamic barn cat – Col. Gustav Hoffman. I was the Commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp in New Braunfels, Texas at the time Nancy came home with this little kitten she had picked up on a street corner, downtown San Antonio. A 16 -17 year old intern (Kenny Morris) with us at the time identified the kitten’s sex as a male, stating emphatically, “I know these things.” Thus the name. A month or two later, he was to taken and be “fixed”, but he turned out to be a he! The moniker took and she is Gustav to this day.

 

One of our many Ducks
Duc Duck

DUC DUCK is just one of the numerous ducks we have enjoyed over the years – this on lived (by dodging the coyotes, raccoons, opossums and the like) much longer than any other duck we have had. Each evening her would come up from the pond and sleep with the pigs. I think they enjoyed his company a good bit. Then come morning, he’d waddle back out to the pasture and eat grass, then go take a dip in the pond. What a wonderful life.

Bared Roak Rooster
Bared Rock Rooster  Stone Wall Jackson

 

STONEWALL JACKSON was Nancy’s pet rooster – a barred rock that would follow her around the farm and jump up and set on her arm chair. When she prayed out loud – at the conclusion of evoking the Deity, STONWALL would crow a joyous AMEN.

Honestly, with wonderful farm animals like these, we want to celebrate their remembrances as parts in our lives.

At times, when I travel by a factory farm I wonder if the corporate officers of that place give a damn or not about their livestock crammed in those small pens, packed on that feed lot. When I think of the shallowness of the farmers raising genetically modified malnourishing grains, I wonder if they knowingly care that what they are doing is destroying our earth, our farms, our farm animals, our families, our friends.

Well, here is my last offering, the beautiful little artist that painted these magnificent creatures for Falster Farm – Mrs. York Midge Iguchie.

The Artist on Falster Farm
Marge Iguchie – The Artist in our lives

 

Fini – Karl E. Falster, Sr.