I’m Thinking Non Registered Mini Milk Cow

“I’m thinking a mini milk cow that is unregistered and little less expensive would be best for my husband and I for our first milking cow.  Do you have any available?” KIM

You know Kim, there should be little difference between a “well bred” cross (or composite) cow and a well bred Full Blood cow. This could be the case IF you know the history of the parental line and that the animals have been selected, over time, for those certain characteristics that everyone will want.

There is a reason that we have customers all across America, in Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, and the Philippines . . . we are Seed Stock Producers that have been selecting for the following traits and practices since 1999:

  • We treat our cows “tougher” than you treat your cows. Although treated with very low stress Animal Welfare, our bulls and cows are on pasture 365, rain or shine, snow or egg frying hot.
  • We develop the bulls  and cows on forage – with nothing but hay, salt, minerals, and North Sea Seaweed as  supplements.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for disposition from calf-hood to sell point.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for feet and leg conformation, which is an indicator of tenderness and ease of fleshing.
  • We evaluate and score bulls for preputial (Penis Sheath) prolapse problems.
  • Provide an udder score for the bulls and all females that we sell.
  • Provide a One-Year Guarantee on the bulls that we sell.
  • We guarantee our bulls for calving ease, by Live Cover or their Frozen Semen.
  • We guarantee each bull and cow sold to be free from genetic defects.
  • We control flies and other parasites with our genetics – instead of chemicals.
  • We invite customers and the general public to participate in bull, cow and heifer evaluation (Farm Day.)
  • We provide “bend over backwards” service to our customers before and after the sell.

Falster Farm on Pasture 365™  has spent the last 18+ years producing low-maintenance cattle that can increase pleasure, pounds and profit per acre in every environment they have been placed. We have developed our genetics and herd size by utilizing hard core selection processes and “cutting edge” technology to restore the tried and true heritage genetics that make beef and milk great. Specifically, we use Artificial Insemination to time when a cow conceives and delivers (cosmic optimization), and embryo transplants (ET) from our most desirable mamma cows; placing them into a herd of cows that are of the same stature, just not registered(able).

Our success rate is between 75%-80%, some 30% better than the average effort, and we are thankful to God for this. Since not every AI or ET effort is successful, a Live Cover follow-up bull is placed on the whole herd and observed as to whom he gives his attention. The resultant offspring of the Herd Sire and the Recip cow give us a composite we originally called a “Hersey”, since we used old world size Jersey cows in our first years of this kinda herd development work.

(B)y following the directions of M. Guenon, as laid down in the treatise, anyone can tell with certainty whether a cow is a good milker, or whether a heifer will become one, so that there need be no doubt as to the profit of raising an animal, and no chance of being taken in the purchase of one.”
— National tribute of the French Government Paris, September 17, 1848. This quotation is from the first page of the 14th edition of A Treatise on Milch Cows by M. Francois Guenon.

I hope you will profit from my short missive and see what the Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ program delivers our customers.

Non Registered Heifer 1607
Side View of Non Registered Heifer 1607.

At left is a dual purpose 1st time heifer with outstanding Mini Cow attributes. Her Top Line is flat with a long and wide pelvic area, yielding ease of calving on the female side. If you notice the darker shading along the bottom of her barrel: that is hair that lies with growth going up, while the top hair is growing down. Known as the pancreatic hair whorl, the presence and density of this feature assures the buyer that this heifer has a high level of genetic potential for positive reproductive capacity. Her lower (bottom) line is nearly flat toward the front (Brisket.) This indicates full lung development and lots of room for well developed rumen and organs. Note her legs are feminine and set wide apart.

Non Registered Heifer 1607

Now, let’s now look at her rear end. These photos were taken of her just entering Falster’s corrals, with no touch ups. Notice her tail, how it hangs clean and clear of the vulva. She will be an easy breeding cow, with lots of size in her pelvis and flank. We can’t see her udder but it is as correct as one could wish, tight and high. Her tail set is clean and straight off the top allowing for ease of calf delivery.

So, here is the why in what I see in this heifer:
Her neck is moderately long, which is an indicator of growth; she is clean and trim in the throat area; her loin and rump show to be long, wide, and level causing the animal to be long strong and flat in her back;
Extremely short-bodied and short- legged cattle are associated with excessive fat deposition and inefficient growth rates; Long-legged and long-bodied cattle are associated with late maturity and low-quality grades. This heifer is well proportioned.
She is of a dual purpose nature, so her round of beef should be deep and wide when viewed from the rear, with the widest portion being about midway between the tail head and hock;
The shoulder should be and is well-muscled, but free of coarseness; offspring with extremely heavy, open shoulders can cause calving difficulties, which none of her ancestry exhibits;
A beefy milking animal should be moderately trim in its rear flank, underline, and brisket, and carry minimal excessive waste; at the same time, the animal should show good depth of body, indicating body capacity and overall productiveness.
She has a wide, full heart girth, adequate spring of the fore-ribs, and a wide chest floor and chest indicating proper growth and function of her vital organs; an adequate width between front and hind legs also indicating good body capacity and muscling.
She has soundness of Feet and Legs. Visual appraisal of structural soundness is useful in evaluating longevity and productivity. For cattle to travel and remain sound during long productive lives, they must have correct conformation of feet and legs.

As a cow, this animal will deliver rich milk for her owner, enough to feed the human family and carry her calf as well. I expect you can see that her offspring of a bull calf will be productive as a beef steer and a heifer will develop similar traits as she. Falster Farm has the capacity to supply her genetics with credible predictability most anywhere on earth.

Now, she is for sale, and several others as well – as of this posting. Thank you for your interest, now you know to judge a cow for tenderness, longevity and reproductive capacity.

NOTES: I’m beholding to Kit Pharo of Pharo Cattle Company for codifying the points of selection of a good bull and adding the observation about the preputial in many breeding animals. Gerald Fry and Steve Campbell really opened my eyes to a more natural way to predict to genetic development in cattle through their referral of the “Milch Cow” that so wonderfully gives us signs and proportions of the well balanced milk and beef cow.

What You Are Getting When You Buy Beef From Falster

Buying & Pricing:

We sell our beef cows & steers Live Weight or Hanging weight. Live Weight is when you pick up from us the (usually) calf to finish out your self and the Hanging Weight is when we carry it to the processor (abattoir) for you. Live Weight is $3.00 per pound, F.O.B. our corrals, Hanging Weight is $5.00 on the rail. The Hanging Weight purchase includes a complementary delivery to Coke, Mineola or Sulfur Springs, Texas).

You a invited to come and personally select select the beeve. Karl or a Top Hand, will escort you through the pastures and offer an interesting and informative consult about the Falster method of rearing quality beef cattle.

Sides, 1/2’s and Quarters:

A hanging side is one half of one beef divided lengthwise, fully dressed and hanging in the cooler. A hanging side is ready to

Still doing it the Old Way – Hand carved.

be cut into your favorite cuts. Before the side is cut we recommend it hang in the cooler for a minimum of 7 – 10 days. This allows natural enzymes to further tenderize the meat for your enjoyment. This is a very important part of preparing quality meat. Most of the commercial beef sold in large grocery chains is cut into smaller pieces immediately after slaughter and shipped in boxes to where it is processed. The commercial beef industry regards the shipping time of “boxed” meat to be sufficient in replacing the age old practice of “hanging” in the cooler. It simply does not produce the same result. Additionally the commercial ground beef you buy will be from a whole host of different cows thrown in the “tub” and mixed.

Finished and Ready Buy

It takes us about 2 years to get a steer to maturity – pretty slow process – that animal will have had the time to fully develop the marbling many of our customers are seeking. That said; with us, the size of the animal is going to be regulated by the breed as well as age. We call that size Frame Size. All our beef cattle are from pure breed small to medium frame Hereford or Red Angus stock. So, you can tell us the approximate amount of beef you wish to put in the freezer and we can select to fill your personal desire.

Our larger sides of beef will weigh between 180 and 225 lbs. You can buy as many sides as you wish and you can specify a smaller or larger side (smaller or larger steer.) The only difference you will notice between small and large sides is in the size of the steaks and roasts. If you are interested in less than one side we suggest you find a friend who would like their meat cut in a similar way as yours, purchase one side for both of you and you will each effectively end up with a “quarter” beef.

One side provides you with; one hind quarter (the round), one front quarter (the chuck), one flank, one tenderloin and one complete rib. Our price for one hanging side is based on the hanging weight.  That price per pound  is currently $5.25. Obviously, a 200 lb. side would cost you 200 x the price per pound (hanging weight).

Cost to custom cut and wrap or vacuum pack into retail cuts is additional. Currently you can figure on 90 cents for freezer wrap and $1.15 for vacuum packing (per pound.).  It is important to remember that if you request mostly boneless cuts you may lose up to 30% of the total weight.

The abattoir you select will provide you with a cut sheet so you can specify how you would like your meat cut. Also; from our experience, we can  provide you with a description of the cut options and we will gladly go over these options with you over the phone to help meet your family’s needs. You will specify the types and size of roasts (bone in or boneless) you prefer. Whether you want your hamburger in 1, 2 or 3 lb packages or some of each. You will choose between having your tenderloin cut into filet mignon accompanied by New York strips or leave the tenderloin in and cut T-bones and Delmonico steaks. Will you want standing rib roasts or rib steaks or some of each? Will you want sirloin steaks and flank steaks or would you prefer to have it ground to make terrific hamburger? Stew meat, liver, brisket and even dog bones – these are all choices we will be happy to help you with.

CALL NOW WITH QUESTIONS AND ORDERS
903-629-3034

What do I look for in a herd bull . . . ?

111515_1507_ForSaleFals2.pngI believe that many breeders make the mistake of thinking that every bull calf born out of good parents will make a quality herd sire. That swapping their bull calf for another’s bull calf will fix or ensure genetic diversity. Make no mistake about it; there are a lot of other characteristics to consider when choosing a prospective herd sire than just having a different bull. Falster Farm doesn’t select our Mini Bull herd sires on their draw in show ring or if someone will trade us their bull calf for one of ours. After the show ring, most animals are unfit for real ranch and a farm breeding life, not by genetics necessarily, but by rearing on high powered forced gains by grain! Fact: he will be short lived, short winded, and if taken off grain, a serious loss of virility ensues. Same for the female show cow. Show animals are a great way to downgrade your herd’s virility and sustainability (proven in my experience.)

Let’s Look um Over . . . What should you look for?

First place to look: A Breeders Reputation is the basis of our cattle ranching heritage. It’s your 1st assurance of quality, and ethics of the breeder, you should consider his guarantees – if any. The STUD BOOK of any registry is only reliable if the governing membership enforces the rules of the organization, and the members adhere

America's #1 Pasture Monthly.
Falster featured in America’s #1 Pasture Monthly.

to those standards. Now, I’m going to make a course statement in a minute about show cattle but it wasn’t always a case of grain fed stock vs. pature finished beef as the driving force for the associations. Be that as it may, the breed association is the basis for the quality and reliability of the pure bred seed stock.

Disposition is a very important trait that I look for. Ninety-nine percent of the time, if the mother cow has a good disposition, so will the calf. I won’t even consider a calf for a herd sire if he is constantly bouncing off the fence and

Horn Weights
Buyers looking over Horn Weights on yearling Mini Hereford Bull KNF CIBOLO

trying to crawl under the gate every time he is brought into the corral pens. Besides that, his mother won’t stay long with that kind of attitude (thus the importance of data base selection records.) My Herd Bulls are not to be feared, but, respected and enjoyed. Even though they are short (just tipping the end of the ear), I train the horns to curve down, they are powerful animals, and they must to have a good disposition. Again, disposition is bred into an animal and is a very important trait when choosing a herd sire prospect. If you can’t work with him, he can hurt you and your stock.

Masculine traits are very important. I want a bull calf that looks like a bull calf and acts like a bull calf. I want to look in his face and know I am looking at a bull. As I observe him out in the pasture, I want to see him following after cows that are in heat. I want to see him butting heads with other calves and

Mini Bull Yearling PRINCE RUPERT
Yearling Mini Bull PRINCE RUPERT

generally acting like a young boy. It’s just like watching boys grow up. They are rolling around, getting dirty, and acting tough and chasing girls even though at the time they wouldn’t know what to do if they caught one. These are early masculine traits that can be observed and noted at an early age. They must be there if he is to be a working Herd Bull. AND here’s one reason why: I’ve had more than one big Brangus bull jump over our fence and try to breed a miniature cow in heat. The herd bull must protect / defend his herd from intruders as well as service them. This is a must with me. I’ve had my bull Dagmar hold off three different bulls over a three year period . . . once he went two days sparing with a Beef Master before I knew the brute was in our pasture. Dagmar’s face was looking like a beaten prize fighter but his momma cows were not damaged, and he healed up soon enough. His get are with us today, and we love um. The winners are seed stock, the loosers taste great. Both have the very best life that can be had living on the land with excellent pasyurage and clean water and minerals.

Physical Conformation too; a good disposition, masculine traits, and a good sire and dam are things you would want in a herd sire prospect of any breed. When I look for a Miniature Registered Hereford or Mini Jersey herd sire prospect, I look for the traits that made our cattle what they are. An overall view of this calf would show me a clean underline with a tight sheath and navel. The testicular development would be normal and adequate with both testicles down and of equal size. A straight top line, adequate length, beefy broad hips, but not overly muscled, small to medium ears and showing good horn growth for his age. I want to see a calf that is healthy and his general appearance is attractive. I’m looking for length of loin and a medium and balanced skeletal structure. A youngster < 14 months will not have the big neck, but the hair should show curly density and the scrotal sac should too. An 18 month old prospect should be showing size in the neck and very curly neck and forehead hair. His sack should look like a ping pong paddle when viewed from the rear. The older he gets the more distance from the body (heat) it should descend. 

From conception to birth and from weaning to yearling, he is a herd sire prospect. But, somewhere along the way, I have to make a decision. Do I have a bull that represents the Miniature Hereford or Jersey breed of cattle and can he pass on the traditional traits to future generations? Is he going to fulfill the breeding plan of our Falster farm? Do I like him? Does my wife want to keep him? Her sense of judgment is very intuitive and I rely on it to “feel” things that are relationship orientated, feelings that I often over look.

My grandpa taught me that the bull was ½ the value of the entire herd. I won’t tell you that story here, but; I’ve learned to be very critical when it comes to choosing herd sire prospects. Unless a bull calf surpasses his sire, that bull ought to be in a pet steer or on some discriminating dining table. A quality herd sire is an expensive, but the most important investment you can make in the cattle business. Anytime you breed undesirable traits you are multiplying those bad traits many times over and polluting future generations. One year of poorly selected breeding can take several years to correct.

Using these guidelines, I, and you will have chosen consistently excellent herd sire prospects. I will closely observe him through weaning and on to breeding age. He will be weighed at weaning and at yearling age. His scrotal measurements will be taken and recorded. At breeding age he will he bred to a good set of heifers, and his production record will have begun. Hopefully, I have made the right choice, and I will have a great Miniature Hereford herd sire.

Karl Emmett Falster, Sr.

Capt. Karl is a lifelong student of Southern Agricultural principals of small family farm sustainability. He and his wife Nancy own and farm Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ in Wood County Texas. He reguarly does consultation services. A former United States Marine, Falster is the CEO of a non-profit organization that teaches Veterans to Farm: WARRIORS THAT FARM®

Lesser Jersey SHOTZIE

Shown here: It’s a 30 lbs. heifer born to SHOTZE the mini Jersey Cow on 25 SEP 2015.Mini Jersey SHOTZIE collage

For Sale $5000 SHOTZIE is a beautiful young proven Mid Size (Lesser Jersey) mama cow born on Falster Farm, 27 JAN 2012. She has been on lush pasturage all her life. 45” tall at the hip, she is milked easily by hand and or machine. Her 1st calf (2014) was a heifer (1445 HEART HEAD) that has passed the selection process and is available as a pasture exposed virgin heifer now. SHOTZIE has given us another heifer calf on the ground (KNF ROSIE) now under our observation of growth and development.

SHOTZIE is the daughter of the KNF BENNETT ORLANDO our former Mini Jersey Herd Sire that sold to certified dairy in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, to down size a dairy herd there, and the beautiful Mini Jersey TRACY KATHRINE. Both parents are registered with the American Miniature Jersey Association of Nebraska.

SHOTZIE with 2015 heifer calf ROSIE
SHOTZIE with 2015 heifer calf ROSIE

The observations of SHOTZIE over her months of development are that she is an upper mid herd member of the dairy herd, ranked #3 in the pecking order in our herd of 7. She is an experienced and excellent mothering cow with good milk and longevity of milking. She strongly prefers to be in the herd and not alone, therefore it is recommended she be purchased with her offspring or added to an existing herd of cattle. She should readily fit in and flourish.

 

Sharing the Falster’s Farm Table

Sharing is Farm Caring – Sustainable Farming at its core.

Visitors to our Sustainable Farm in East Texas will frequently set at our dining room table. Of course we share our meals, planning session, entertain prospective buyers of our mini cattle, gourmet beef, gourmet pork and poultry – all raised on pasture and most of them finished on clover at our table .  .  . Folks get to know their farmer in no better way.

When we set down together, our visitors are impressed by the uniqueness of the table top – it is covered with paintings of our most beloved animals from the past:

buyers - consultationThis Canadian couple came to partake of our On-Farm-Consulting Services. Our Bio-Dynamic farming practices attract folks from all over the country and numerous visitors on the WWOOF program. Here is a good view of our table depicting several of our animal friends. Animal welfare is a big component of our farm/ranch. Our mini Hereford beef cattle, mini Jersey dairy cows, pigs, chickens and ducks, are all treated with respect and live in as low stress environment as can possibly be provided.

On our table or board we can see our Coat of Arms center stage, and each place has a painting of one of our beloved animal friends (personalities) of past years.

 My Current Falster Coat of Arms:

In the center of the table is the Farmer Falster version of my family coat of arms – the Ancient Arms of Falster as we know it is the gold chevrons below the lion in red.

Table Falster Coat of Arms
The Warrior Farmer Falster Coat of Arms

Now, in heraldry the custom was to treat/make a depiction of a man’s honor in battle on a emblazoned crest or shied – a standard.

In my personal life history: After serving in combat in Viet Nam as a US Marine (Scout Warrior with 1/!), awarded several medals for valor, I started a franchise company called Falster Knives – thus the sword.

My people come from a Danish Island named Falster Island – thus the Viking Helm.

Our efforts at farming here in Texas respect the values of the past in order to preserve the prospects of the future – thus the Valhalla type style in the lettering.

Let’s look now at those animals we honor on this broad board:

Table Falster - Paint Horse KNF FOLGER
FOLGER – One Hot Cup of Coffee under saddle

Falster’s Paint Cow Pony FOLGER:

FOLGER and his ½ brother RAZ-MA-TAZ served as my cow horses and saddle mount in reenactment parades around South Texas for many years. FOLGER is a two blue eyed registered paint gelding. He is Nancy’s horse and wants to do more work than we have for him to do now.

I say that because of the injuries I have to my bones and joins over the years of rough cowboy work on the farm.

To offset that loss of flexibility, we tried to find a suitable working dog. that would afford good companion as well as herding style.

Table Falster American Farm Collie BELL
American Farm Collie BELL

The most beautiful dog to possess those attributes was our American Farm Collie – BELLE.

Willie has put in a good day's work
Border Collie KNF WILFORD von FALSTER “Willie”

She was everything one could want in a slow moving working dog, including a loving and respectful family dog. Like RAZ-MA-TAZ she has gone on to be with the Creator, and we have her replacement with us today: KNF WOLFORD VON FALSTER – our pure blood Border Collie “Willie” shown here resting after a hard day’s work herding cows out to their Summer quarters. He is assertive almost beyond compare and lives to be at my side, or on a long outreach to fetch up our mini cattle, pigs, chickens, ducks or any thing I send him to fetch..

So what are these cows that need herding?

At the Master’s end of the table resides a portrait of the world renowned miniature Hereford herd sire KNF CIBOLO.

Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO
Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO

At my Ladies end of the board sets Nancy Gail Faster and her place s held by very 1st dairy cow and the foundation of our mini Jersey dairy line – her name was ANNAKNF ANNE.

ANNA was the most theatrical cow one could ever meet. There simply is not enough space in this missive to tell all the tails that come to mind with most of these creatures, but ANNA is perhaps to most cunning, and comical of the lot.

Of course we have had goats, and lots of them of several wonderful breeds but the smartest and most charming was a cross between a Lamancha and a Pigmy Goat – named Bar-B-Que. BARBE was a show goat – not a powder puff show goat but a showboat show goat that loved to travel – especially to the “old folks” homes around San Antonio.

Pigmy Goat "BAR B QUE"
Pigmy Goat “BAR B QUE”

On the farm Barbie was a rough and tumble little fella trying to hold his own amongst a large company of larger animals.

But upon entering the foyer of a building he became the persona of a gentleman goat. Riding up and down the elevator, waiting respectfully outside the patient’s room, jumping up on their bed when called – you name it, that goat could do it!

Gustav the Barn Cat
The Lion at Falster Farm – Miss Col. Gustav Hoffman

Well Now, what farm would be complete without a dynamic barn cat – Col. Gustav Hoffman. I was the Commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp in New Braunfels, Texas at the time Nancy came home with this little kitten she had picked up on a street corner, downtown San Antonio. A 16 -17 year old intern (Kenny Morris) with us at the time identified the kitten’s sex as a male, stating emphatically, “I know these things.” Thus the name. A month or two later, he was to taken and be “fixed”, but he turned out to be a he! The moniker took and she is Gustav to this day.

 

One of our many Ducks
Duc Duck

DUC DUCK is just one of the numerous ducks we have enjoyed over the years – this on lived (by dodging the coyotes, raccoons, opossums and the like) much longer than any other duck we have had. Each evening her would come up from the pond and sleep with the pigs. I think they enjoyed his company a good bit. Then come morning, he’d waddle back out to the pasture and eat grass, then go take a dip in the pond. What a wonderful life.

Bared Roak Rooster
Bared Rock Rooster  Stone Wall Jackson

 

STONEWALL JACKSON was Nancy’s pet rooster – a barred rock that would follow her around the farm and jump up and set on her arm chair. When she prayed out loud – at the conclusion of evoking the Deity, STONWALL would crow a joyous AMEN.

Honestly, with wonderful farm animals like these, we want to celebrate their remembrances as parts in our lives.

At times, when I travel by a factory farm I wonder if the corporate officers of that place give a damn or not about their livestock crammed in those small pens, packed on that feed lot. When I think of the shallowness of the farmers raising genetically modified malnourishing grains, I wonder if they knowingly care that what they are doing is destroying our earth, our farms, our farm animals, our families, our friends.

Well, here is my last offering, the beautiful little artist that painted these magnificent creatures for Falster Farm – Mrs. York Midge Iguchie.

The Artist on Falster Farm
Marge Iguchie – The Artist in our lives

 

Fini – Karl E. Falster, Sr.

 

2013 ORGANIC INTERNS ARRIVING

Brage (Bo) Frick of Sweden

As we ended 2012 and started 2013 we have started several projects by the advent and aid of interns and WOOFERS literally from around the world.

1st project is a clay baking oven that was built by Brage (Bo) Frick of Sweden. You can view his project details at: Bo’s Clay Oven.

This hand built clay oven yields marvelous artisanal breads and pizza as well as cooks full meals in a fraction of the time – with such flavor that must be tasted to fully appreciate.

Built from scratch, we plan to have the oven in service at the Winnsboro Farmers Market this Spring in the Winnsboro City Park. In addition to the building of Bo’s Oven he has be an assistant to Chef Nancy on several special chef jobs in East Texas. Bo’s plans are to return to Sweden and enter business for himself as a speciality street-vender in Stockholm.

Bo has a master’s degree in agronomy and has used his time on Falster Farm to actually implement in practice many of the technical theories he learned in university. I believe he discovered that in practice of sustainable agriculture some of the modern notions don’t have much bottom to um. He got to learn how to care and ride a horse as well as build livestock shelters that birth pigs and chickens.

Additionally, he wielded sections of steel and sheet metal on the main barn converting it from a hay barn to a good size shop and headquarters. He exhibits good leadership skills and ran the re-fencing efforts over on the Creed place, a leased property for the Falster Miniature Hereford herd.

 

    Mohamed Jan Jalloh of Free Town Sierra Leon Africa

On Spring break from EARTH University in Costa Rica where he studies for a degree in Agricultural Engineering, Mohamed learned about both diesel and gasoline tractors and how to drive them (even into fence posts.) He too got to burn in some of the class room studies in real time farming, learning about cattle pig and chicken care.

Each individual on Falster Farm gets to work on a project that is somewhat of their design or implementation. For the 1st time we had bailed up 17 2000# rounds of “Inon and Clay” peas as hight protein silage. We need a means of feeding it and our dry hay to the 2012 crop of steers and heifers. Mohamed built a special setup outside the corrals to house the hay and allow the steers and heifers exclusive access to it. Naturally we call this place Mohamed’s hay pen.

He also did a good bit of painting and field fence restoration while with us. He plans on returning to his native West Africa and help local farmers implement sustainable protocols and engineering there.

Rodeo Pick-up CowGirls

A Working Boot She Wore!

Boy-oh-Boy, we get a bunch of different load-out opportunities of calves and cows – but one of the most challenging was a couple of cowgirls from up in Illinois – what a wonder!

Usually when a customer is coming to pick up their cattle for Live Cover Breeding by one of our Herd Sires or a purchase of live cattle, they bring a covered trailer, mostly stock trailers but occasionally a horse trailer is used, but the most interesting and difficult is a pickup truck or SUV. Yes we have had some folks come with a cardboard partition around a large dog crate and pick up their newly purchased mini calf. A mini calf in the 300 – 400 pound range is a big lift to a none trailer ride and a lift to a high lifter truck is really a big-un!

Nancy sold two weanling bull calves to a non-profit children’s therapy group in Northern Illinois and after some negotiations they decided to send their director of the farm down to pick the two bull calves . . .Big Yellow Truck to Pick up Mini Steers

I always ask Nancy what the customer is bringing to pick up their animal with so I can make any custom panel arrangements for their comfort and a time saver for us both.  As I exited the restroom on Saturday morning I asked the question. Boy was I floored when she said it would be a pick-up truck with a hand-made wooden crate in the back. “We can’t make a ramp to accommodate that high a lift in an hour’s time honey!” (and some other things that made her cry.) Well, after I apologized many many times, I went out to the corrals to survey what I could put together to make a secure ramp for these young bulls to roar up and into the back of that crate. How would we keep one in while the other was balking, was one of several questions going through my mind?

Then down the front drive I heard the whine of the Big Yellow Dodge 3500 4 wheel drive truck . . . oh my, the height was double of that on a “normal” pick-up . . . we could never ramp up to that. But I directed her to back into the 6′ gate side of the corrals.

 As I looked over the situation I was perplexed as to what to do about the load up but Ms Jody had the idea that we could heft them up into the back of that rig – I could nearly cry at the thought of such a lift by myself with just a couple of girls to push. Geese what next!

Slip the halter on the mini bull
Jody ready on the Head Gate

But she was standing on the back of the truck and I could see the cut of her boots that she was no slacker, rather a young woman who had walked through a bunch of shit (manure). So I said, “OK, I guess we can hog tie um up and put em in the front end loader?” Her buddy Kristy suggested we get a halter on um and then we could pull them down and tie um up.

 So the Mini Bull with a halter in place we were ready to open the bottom panel and drop and tie him up! Then the Rodeo began . . .

 

 

 

Halter Ready on Mini Bull
Halter Ready on Mini Bull
Drop him w/the rope
Cinch it up real tight for crying out loud!

 

Getting a leg on him.
Lugging him into front end loader
Lugging him into front end loader
Moving Slow to the truck
Lower Mini Bull onto tail gate.
Quickly lower the crate’s gate.

 So, after the cowgirls rolled him out of the front end loader and rolled onto the upper deck, the other Mini Bull calf brought up and placed alongside they dropped the gate panel and untied them! Slick as a whistle and away they went up North. My daddy would have been proud of me and would have liked to meet those two girls. A real treat! Nancy did a great job taking photos so we’d have this recorded to share with y’all.

Box um Up and let roll !!!

 

 

76 Acre East Texas Farm Available

76 acre non-certified organic and biodynamic family farm & ranch is for sale in Wood County, East Texas. Husband and wife sellers are willing to stay/live on-site to teach/advise/mentor you in how to become a successful sustainable Rancher/Farmer. This property is next to nothing for privacy and close to everything for convenience.

76 Rolling Post Oak Savannah acres, (+) or (-) 85 head of pastured: beef, Heritage Pigs, Chickens for meat and eggs, 13 active hives of Honey Bees. 18 acre Hay Meadow, 30 acres of pristine white ball clover for beef and pork finishing and honey. Land is gated with wielded pipe fence on County Maintained black top road. Fenced and cross fenced with lots of hard wood and pine trees, 3 wells. Property is surrounded by big woods and meadows on all sides, on paved county road 8 miles from Quitman and 7 Miles from Winnsboro, Texas.

Since 1989, Falster Farm has enjoyed an international market presence and acclaim in Europe and the Pacific Basin, selling Live Cattle and Artificial Breeding products of Miniature Registered Herefords and Miniature Jersey milk cows: www.falsterfarm.com. Falster is a producer of Branded pork and beef cuts of meat: Falling Star Brand. Currently we have a contract to supply Sheraton Convention Center, Dallas, Texas. Additionally, the Falster Farm has been the subject of numerous national and regional magazine and newspaper columns, including the prestigious ACRES USA.

Two Large full drip irrigated truck gardens & fruit tree orchard, black berry and blue berries, grape and Muscatine vineyards (about 2 acres.) A 50′ x 20′ Greenhouse started.   Student/apprentice cabin, two barns, 2 outbuildings, 3 covered sheds, large storage trailer, horse, cattle and pig paddocks all lead to corrals with electric and water. The Corral has a covered squeeze shoot and full loading facilities.

All farm equipment: mechanic’s tools, 2 tractors with full implements for cultivation, hay handling, spraying of organic teas and fertilizers; a 30′ and a 14′ covered stock trailers to haul cattle, 3 farm trailers. Every manner of tool and equipment to milk cows and goats, tend pigs and chickens and make the finest honey available is included. This is a full orbed sustainable farm, with many custom tools and equipment items included.County Line Magazine Article featuring Nancy Falster's mini Jersey

Additionally, new buyer will own all mineral and full water rights in the State of Texas. Wood County has one of the lowest tax bases in the nation, while located in the mid point between Dallas, Shreveport, Tyler and Texarkana, a local market of 30,000.

WHAT IS NOT HERE: no high tension overhead wires or electric sub-station, no railroad tracks, no commercial chicken houses, no factory farms, no oil pumping stations, no commercial easements, not much traffic at all — so our air is clean and the nights are quiet, our livestock get only the freshest air and sunshine and so will the new owner.   Present owners are willing to stay onsite to teach, train and educate buyers to be successful at sustainable Texas Ranch life – if requested. Only $998,000, grab your cowboy hat and head for TEXAS!

Cattle Dog “WILLIE” w/ Goober & Tracy

To learn more about Falster Farm please visit our web page “History of Falster Farm