I’m Thinking Non Registered Mini Milk Cow

“I’m thinking a mini milk cow that is unregistered and little less expensive would be best for my husband and I for our first milking cow.  Do you have any available?” KIM

You know Kim, there should be little difference between a “well bred” cross (or composite) cow and a well bred Full Blood cow. This could be the case IF you know the history of the parental line and that the animals have been selected, over time, for those certain characteristics that everyone will want.

There is a reason that we have customers all across America, in Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, and the Philippines . . . we are Seed Stock Producers that have been selecting for the following traits and practices since 1999:

  • We treat our cows “tougher” than you treat your cows. Although treated with very low stress Animal Welfare, our bulls and cows are on pasture 365, rain or shine, snow or egg frying hot.
  • We develop the bulls  and cows on forage – with nothing but hay, salt, minerals, and North Sea Seaweed as  supplements.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for disposition from calf-hood to sell point.
  • We evaluate and score each bull and cow for feet and leg conformation, which is an indicator of tenderness and ease of fleshing.
  • We evaluate and score bulls for preputial (Penis Sheath) prolapse problems.
  • Provide an udder score for the bulls and all females that we sell.
  • Provide a One-Year Guarantee on the bulls that we sell.
  • We guarantee our bulls for calving ease, by Live Cover or their Frozen Semen.
  • We guarantee each bull and cow sold to be free from genetic defects.
  • We control flies and other parasites with our genetics – instead of chemicals.
  • We invite customers and the general public to participate in bull, cow and heifer evaluation (Farm Day.)
  • We provide “bend over backwards” service to our customers before and after the sell.

Falster Farm on Pasture 365™  has spent the last 18+ years producing low-maintenance cattle that can increase pleasure, pounds and profit per acre in every environment they have been placed. We have developed our genetics and herd size by utilizing hard core selection processes and “cutting edge” technology to restore the tried and true heritage genetics that make beef and milk great. Specifically, we use Artificial Insemination to time when a cow conceives and delivers (cosmic optimization), and embryo transplants (ET) from our most desirable mamma cows; placing them into a herd of cows that are of the same stature, just not registered(able).

Our success rate is between 75%-80%, some 30% better than the average effort, and we are thankful to God for this. Since not every AI or ET effort is successful, a Live Cover follow-up bull is placed on the whole herd and observed as to whom he gives his attention. The resultant offspring of the Herd Sire and the Recip cow give us a composite we originally called a “Hersey”, since we used old world size Jersey cows in our first years of this kinda herd development work.

(B)y following the directions of M. Guenon, as laid down in the treatise, anyone can tell with certainty whether a cow is a good milker, or whether a heifer will become one, so that there need be no doubt as to the profit of raising an animal, and no chance of being taken in the purchase of one.”
— National tribute of the French Government Paris, September 17, 1848. This quotation is from the first page of the 14th edition of A Treatise on Milch Cows by M. Francois Guenon.

I hope you will profit from my short missive and see what the Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ program delivers our customers.

Non Registered Heifer 1607
Side View of Non Registered Heifer 1607.

At left is a dual purpose 1st time heifer with outstanding Mini Cow attributes. Her Top Line is flat with a long and wide pelvic area, yielding ease of calving on the female side. If you notice the darker shading along the bottom of her barrel: that is hair that lies with growth going up, while the top hair is growing down. Known as the pancreatic hair whorl, the presence and density of this feature assures the buyer that this heifer has a high level of genetic potential for positive reproductive capacity. Her lower (bottom) line is nearly flat toward the front (Brisket.) This indicates full lung development and lots of room for well developed rumen and organs. Note her legs are feminine and set wide apart.

Non Registered Heifer 1607

Now, let’s now look at her rear end. These photos were taken of her just entering Falster’s corrals, with no touch ups. Notice her tail, how it hangs clean and clear of the vulva. She will be an easy breeding cow, with lots of size in her pelvis and flank. We can’t see her udder but it is as correct as one could wish, tight and high. Her tail set is clean and straight off the top allowing for ease of calf delivery.

So, here is the why in what I see in this heifer:
Her neck is moderately long, which is an indicator of growth; she is clean and trim in the throat area; her loin and rump show to be long, wide, and level causing the animal to be long strong and flat in her back;
Extremely short-bodied and short- legged cattle are associated with excessive fat deposition and inefficient growth rates; Long-legged and long-bodied cattle are associated with late maturity and low-quality grades. This heifer is well proportioned.
She is of a dual purpose nature, so her round of beef should be deep and wide when viewed from the rear, with the widest portion being about midway between the tail head and hock;
The shoulder should be and is well-muscled, but free of coarseness; offspring with extremely heavy, open shoulders can cause calving difficulties, which none of her ancestry exhibits;
A beefy milking animal should be moderately trim in its rear flank, underline, and brisket, and carry minimal excessive waste; at the same time, the animal should show good depth of body, indicating body capacity and overall productiveness.
She has a wide, full heart girth, adequate spring of the fore-ribs, and a wide chest floor and chest indicating proper growth and function of her vital organs; an adequate width between front and hind legs also indicating good body capacity and muscling.
She has soundness of Feet and Legs. Visual appraisal of structural soundness is useful in evaluating longevity and productivity. For cattle to travel and remain sound during long productive lives, they must have correct conformation of feet and legs.

As a cow, this animal will deliver rich milk for her owner, enough to feed the human family and carry her calf as well. I expect you can see that her offspring of a bull calf will be productive as a beef steer and a heifer will develop similar traits as she. Falster Farm has the capacity to supply her genetics with credible predictability most anywhere on earth.

Now, she is for sale, and several others as well – as of this posting. Thank you for your interest, now you know to judge a cow for tenderness, longevity and reproductive capacity.

NOTES: I’m beholding to Kit Pharo of Pharo Cattle Company for codifying the points of selection of a good bull and adding the observation about the preputial in many breeding animals. Gerald Fry and Steve Campbell really opened my eyes to a more natural way to predict to genetic development in cattle through their referral of the “Milch Cow” that so wonderfully gives us signs and proportions of the well balanced milk and beef cow.

What You Are Getting When You Buy Beef From Falster

Buying & Pricing:

We sell our beef cows & steers Live Weight or Hanging weight. Live Weight is when you pick up from us the (usually) calf to finish out your self and the Hanging Weight is when we carry it to the processor (abattoir) for you. Live Weight is $3.00 per pound, F.O.B. our corrals, Hanging Weight is $5.00 on the rail. The Hanging Weight purchase includes a complementary delivery to Coke, Mineola or Sulfur Springs, Texas).

You a invited to come and personally select select the beeve. Karl or a Top Hand, will escort you through the pastures and offer an interesting and informative consult about the Falster method of rearing quality beef cattle.

Sides, 1/2’s and Quarters:

A hanging side is one half of one beef divided lengthwise, fully dressed and hanging in the cooler. A hanging side is ready to

Still doing it the Old Way – Hand carved.

be cut into your favorite cuts. Before the side is cut we recommend it hang in the cooler for a minimum of 7 – 10 days. This allows natural enzymes to further tenderize the meat for your enjoyment. This is a very important part of preparing quality meat. Most of the commercial beef sold in large grocery chains is cut into smaller pieces immediately after slaughter and shipped in boxes to where it is processed. The commercial beef industry regards the shipping time of “boxed” meat to be sufficient in replacing the age old practice of “hanging” in the cooler. It simply does not produce the same result. Additionally the commercial ground beef you buy will be from a whole host of different cows thrown in the “tub” and mixed.

Finished and Ready Buy

It takes us about 2 years to get a steer to maturity – pretty slow process – that animal will have had the time to fully develop the marbling many of our customers are seeking. That said; with us, the size of the animal is going to be regulated by the breed as well as age. We call that size Frame Size. All our beef cattle are from pure breed small to medium frame Hereford or Red Angus stock. So, you can tell us the approximate amount of beef you wish to put in the freezer and we can select to fill your personal desire.

Our larger sides of beef will weigh between 180 and 225 lbs. You can buy as many sides as you wish and you can specify a smaller or larger side (smaller or larger steer.) The only difference you will notice between small and large sides is in the size of the steaks and roasts. If you are interested in less than one side we suggest you find a friend who would like their meat cut in a similar way as yours, purchase one side for both of you and you will each effectively end up with a “quarter” beef.

One side provides you with; one hind quarter (the round), one front quarter (the chuck), one flank, one tenderloin and one complete rib. Our price for one hanging side is based on the hanging weight.  That price per pound  is currently $5.25. Obviously, a 200 lb. side would cost you 200 x the price per pound (hanging weight).

Cost to custom cut and wrap or vacuum pack into retail cuts is additional. Currently you can figure on 90 cents for freezer wrap and $1.15 for vacuum packing (per pound.).  It is important to remember that if you request mostly boneless cuts you may lose up to 30% of the total weight.

The abattoir you select will provide you with a cut sheet so you can specify how you would like your meat cut. Also; from our experience, we can  provide you with a description of the cut options and we will gladly go over these options with you over the phone to help meet your family’s needs. You will specify the types and size of roasts (bone in or boneless) you prefer. Whether you want your hamburger in 1, 2 or 3 lb packages or some of each. You will choose between having your tenderloin cut into filet mignon accompanied by New York strips or leave the tenderloin in and cut T-bones and Delmonico steaks. Will you want standing rib roasts or rib steaks or some of each? Will you want sirloin steaks and flank steaks or would you prefer to have it ground to make terrific hamburger? Stew meat, liver, brisket and even dog bones – these are all choices we will be happy to help you with.

CALL NOW WITH QUESTIONS AND ORDERS
903-629-3034

Pastured Beef “RETAIL CUTS” Yield Considerations

Typically you buy the animal direct from us by simply making a deposit. The price of $5.25 per lbs. (hanging weight) includes all fees associated with getting the beef into Primals. The above retail cuts are ordered from the Locker Plant and at an additional cost for processing.  You can click the link below to start that process. Thank You for doing so.

I AM INDEBTED TO:
Article By: Barbara Bowman, Published by: Gourmet Sleuth, Last Updated: 06/25/2014; AND,
Article By: DANILO ALFARO, Published by The Spruce, Last Updated 02/15/17

Place Your Deposit – Falling Star Beef Primal Cuts

Deposit – Falling Star Natural Beef


Primals of Beef SELECT FROM THE DROP DOWN MENU


Description:

PLACE YOUR DEPOSIT TO RESERVE Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ PRIMAL CUT BEEF. Pricing is per pound based on hanging weight.  Price is $5.25 / pound. Orders are reserved with a $250.00 deposit. 

Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ – Grass Fed, Clover finished Natural Beef

Our Primal Sides are priced per pound. We will bill you the difference upon delivery. This is a deposit only. Deposits are refundable minus a 5% transaction processing charge up until August 15th after which they become non-refundable deposits.

The average side will be about 280 lbs with a range from 240-350 lbs.  We try our best to accommodate size requests as closely as possible, but variability in the growing season means we cannot always match your request exactly . . . Please work with us, as we are delighted to work with you.

Some of the best tasting beef you’ll ever have!!! This is what great beef tastes like. No growth hormones, no nitrite preservatives, no crowded high stress feed lots, is it any wonder it tastes so great?

Please call Nancy at 903-629-3034 or Text 210.859.1465

Miniature Jersey Bred Heifer – PUFFY BLOWFISH

Full Blood Miniature Jersey KNF SEV gave birth to a charming little (25 lbs.) heifer calf on April 26, 2016. Below is a photo of the hours of that birth. Birthing on deep grass and clover, she has the very best environmental and stress-less conditions for a healthy, secure and loving upbringing. The mama cow teaches and nourishes the calf to thrive on the rolling Post Oak savannah of Falster Farm on Pasture 365 days a year.

My comments in her file are:

“12/2/17 4 ml LONGRANGE, MULTIMIN, BOVASHIELD (calf hood injections)
6/2017 Pasture Exposed to T197.
24 OCT 16 Weaned, excellent vigor and friendliness, should be just like her mama.
1 OCT 16 Ran her and other calves through to tag and deworm. Lots of personality, a good thinker.
23APR16 Found her alone in Far South Pasture – had moved herd to Hay Meadow the evening before. SEF jumped the fence to return to her. I separated them – putting calf in hall next to the BUTTERMILK pony. Very feminine, deer like, very assertive nursing and active.”

PUFFY TODAY:

February 2018 finds PUFFY safe in calf, about 4 months pregnant, friendly and awaiting a family farm to start her career as a moderate to heavy milker, standing only some 40″ tall at the hip when fully mature. She has an excellent tight udder, her pelt is golden in color and she is very gentle. Because of her size and deportment she is thrifty and clean . . . perfect for the small farmstead.

A Note About Our Practice:

Our pastures have been free of toxic sprays and chemical fertilizers since 2005 when we bought the place. Our passion is “Raising Food Fit To Eat” — growing nutrient dense beef, dairy and poultry products. We manage our pastures using management intensive grazing practices, never in confinement, never SOY or GMO or HORMONES.

Our animal nutrition is supported with Redmond natural minerals and organic alfalfa. Parasite control is accomplished using diatomaceous earth in the minerals as well as apple cider vinegar in the drinking water. Antibiotics or hormones are never used.

We welcome your inquiry: 903-629-3034 (home) or 210.859.1465 (text).

Mini Jersey Bull – KNF BENNETT ORLANO

bennett_offeringDisplayed here for Pedigree and to purchase Frozen Semen purposes only: American Jersey Association.

Contact: Nancy 903.629.3034
Jump to: Directions
Jump to: Frozen Semen Offer

Calved 28 APR 2010 on Falster Farm by Artifical Insemination of  D Cornor Orlando and KNF standard pure bred Jersey POLLY. He stands 44″ at the hip. Dark coloring makes him most attractive. Geneticly docile.

Historical Notes on his background.

4/12/14 Sold to Dariy in CO for $5,000. Sorry I did.
4/7/14 CHAMPION for Fertility Testing $40 and Collection of 293 Straws on 1st pull. Quitman Animal for Trichonas Tests and health papers $86.00
1/15/14 Moved to the Lewis Place. He remains very easy handeling. He helped me catch up ARGYLE BARNEY for transportation. Finest bull to work with we have on the place.
11NOV11 Recieved the Herseys and the Jerseys to breed
1OCT11 Returned from Harris.
Rented to Andy & Rachell Harris to cover their three cows.
May 30, 2011 first live cover of Katherine Cow. He is very stable and intellegent. He lead the bull calves back and forth from the corrals to the

What do I look for in a herd bull . . . ?

111515_1507_ForSaleFals2.pngI believe that many breeders make the mistake of thinking that every bull calf born out of good parents will make a quality herd sire. That swapping their bull calf for another’s bull calf will fix or ensure genetic diversity. Make no mistake about it; there are a lot of other characteristics to consider when choosing a prospective herd sire than just having a different bull. Falster Farm doesn’t select our Mini Bull herd sires on their draw in show ring or if someone will trade us their bull calf for one of ours. After the show ring, most animals are unfit for real ranch and a farm breeding life, not by genetics necessarily, but by rearing on high powered forced gains by grain! Fact: he will be short lived, short winded, and if taken off grain, a serious loss of virility ensues. Same for the female show cow. Show animals are a great way to downgrade your herd’s virility and sustainability (proven in my experience.)

Let’s Look um Over . . . What should you look for?

First place to look: A Breeders Reputation is the basis of our cattle ranching heritage. It’s your 1st assurance of quality, and ethics of the breeder, you should consider his guarantees – if any. The STUD BOOK of any registry is only reliable if the governing membership enforces the rules of the organization, and the members adhere

America's #1 Pasture Monthly.
Falster featured in America’s #1 Pasture Monthly.

to those standards. Now, I’m going to make a course statement in a minute about show cattle but it wasn’t always a case of grain fed stock vs. pature finished beef as the driving force for the associations. Be that as it may, the breed association is the basis for the quality and reliability of the pure bred seed stock.

Disposition is a very important trait that I look for. Ninety-nine percent of the time, if the mother cow has a good disposition, so will the calf. I won’t even consider a calf for a herd sire if he is constantly bouncing off the fence and

Horn Weights
Buyers looking over Horn Weights on yearling Mini Hereford Bull KNF CIBOLO

trying to crawl under the gate every time he is brought into the corral pens. Besides that, his mother won’t stay long with that kind of attitude (thus the importance of data base selection records.) My Herd Bulls are not to be feared, but, respected and enjoyed. Even though they are short (just tipping the end of the ear), I train the horns to curve down, they are powerful animals, and they must to have a good disposition. Again, disposition is bred into an animal and is a very important trait when choosing a herd sire prospect. If you can’t work with him, he can hurt you and your stock.

Masculine traits are very important. I want a bull calf that looks like a bull calf and acts like a bull calf. I want to look in his face and know I am looking at a bull. As I observe him out in the pasture, I want to see him following after cows that are in heat. I want to see him butting heads with other calves and

Mini Bull Yearling PRINCE RUPERT
Yearling Mini Bull PRINCE RUPERT

generally acting like a young boy. It’s just like watching boys grow up. They are rolling around, getting dirty, and acting tough and chasing girls even though at the time they wouldn’t know what to do if they caught one. These are early masculine traits that can be observed and noted at an early age. They must be there if he is to be a working Herd Bull. AND here’s one reason why: I’ve had more than one big Brangus bull jump over our fence and try to breed a miniature cow in heat. The herd bull must protect / defend his herd from intruders as well as service them. This is a must with me. I’ve had my bull Dagmar hold off three different bulls over a three year period . . . once he went two days sparing with a Beef Master before I knew the brute was in our pasture. Dagmar’s face was looking like a beaten prize fighter but his momma cows were not damaged, and he healed up soon enough. His get are with us today, and we love um. The winners are seed stock, the loosers taste great. Both have the very best life that can be had living on the land with excellent pasyurage and clean water and minerals.

Physical Conformation too; a good disposition, masculine traits, and a good sire and dam are things you would want in a herd sire prospect of any breed. When I look for a Miniature Registered Hereford or Mini Jersey herd sire prospect, I look for the traits that made our cattle what they are. An overall view of this calf would show me a clean underline with a tight sheath and navel. The testicular development would be normal and adequate with both testicles down and of equal size. A straight top line, adequate length, beefy broad hips, but not overly muscled, small to medium ears and showing good horn growth for his age. I want to see a calf that is healthy and his general appearance is attractive. I’m looking for length of loin and a medium and balanced skeletal structure. A youngster < 14 months will not have the big neck, but the hair should show curly density and the scrotal sac should too. An 18 month old prospect should be showing size in the neck and very curly neck and forehead hair. His sack should look like a ping pong paddle when viewed from the rear. The older he gets the more distance from the body (heat) it should descend. 

From conception to birth and from weaning to yearling, he is a herd sire prospect. But, somewhere along the way, I have to make a decision. Do I have a bull that represents the Miniature Hereford or Jersey breed of cattle and can he pass on the traditional traits to future generations? Is he going to fulfill the breeding plan of our Falster farm? Do I like him? Does my wife want to keep him? Her sense of judgment is very intuitive and I rely on it to “feel” things that are relationship orientated, feelings that I often over look.

My grandpa taught me that the bull was ½ the value of the entire herd. I won’t tell you that story here, but; I’ve learned to be very critical when it comes to choosing herd sire prospects. Unless a bull calf surpasses his sire, that bull ought to be in a pet steer or on some discriminating dining table. A quality herd sire is an expensive, but the most important investment you can make in the cattle business. Anytime you breed undesirable traits you are multiplying those bad traits many times over and polluting future generations. One year of poorly selected breeding can take several years to correct.

Using these guidelines, I, and you will have chosen consistently excellent herd sire prospects. I will closely observe him through weaning and on to breeding age. He will be weighed at weaning and at yearling age. His scrotal measurements will be taken and recorded. At breeding age he will he bred to a good set of heifers, and his production record will have begun. Hopefully, I have made the right choice, and I will have a great Miniature Hereford herd sire.

Karl Emmett Falster, Sr.

Capt. Karl is a lifelong student of Southern Agricultural principals of small family farm sustainability. He and his wife Nancy own and farm Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ in Wood County Texas. He reguarly does consultation services. A former United States Marine, Falster is the CEO of a non-profit organization that teaches Veterans to Farm: WARRIORS THAT FARM®