What You Are Getting When You Buy Beef From Falster

Buying & Pricing:

We sell our beef cows & steers Live Weight or Hanging weight. Live Weight is when you pick up from us the (usually) calf to finish out your self and the Hanging Weight is when we carry it to the processor (abattoir) for you. Live Weight is $3.00 per pound, F.O.B. our corrals, Hanging Weight is $5.00 on the rail. The Hanging Weight purchase includes a complementary delivery to Coke, Mineola or Sulfur Springs, Texas).

You a invited to come and personally select select the beeve. Karl or a Top Hand, will escort you through the pastures and offer an interesting and informative consult about the Falster method of rearing quality beef cattle.

Sides, 1/2’s and Quarters:

A hanging side is one half of one beef divided lengthwise, fully dressed and hanging in the cooler. A hanging side is ready to

Still doing it the Old Way – Hand carved.

be cut into your favorite cuts. Before the side is cut we recommend it hang in the cooler for a minimum of 7 – 10 days. This allows natural enzymes to further tenderize the meat for your enjoyment. This is a very important part of preparing quality meat. Most of the commercial beef sold in large grocery chains is cut into smaller pieces immediately after slaughter and shipped in boxes to where it is processed. The commercial beef industry regards the shipping time of “boxed” meat to be sufficient in replacing the age old practice of “hanging” in the cooler. It simply does not produce the same result. Additionally the commercial ground beef you buy will be from a whole host of different cows thrown in the “tub” and mixed.

Finished and Ready Buy

It takes us about 2 years to get a steer to maturity – pretty slow process – that animal will have had the time to fully develop the marbling many of our customers are seeking. That said; with us, the size of the animal is going to be regulated by the breed as well as age. We call that size Frame Size. All our beef cattle are from pure breed small to medium frame Hereford or Red Angus stock. So, you can tell us the approximate amount of beef you wish to put in the freezer and we can select to fill your personal desire.

Our larger sides of beef will weigh between 180 and 225 lbs. You can buy as many sides as you wish and you can specify a smaller or larger side (smaller or larger steer.) The only difference you will notice between small and large sides is in the size of the steaks and roasts. If you are interested in less than one side we suggest you find a friend who would like their meat cut in a similar way as yours, purchase one side for both of you and you will each effectively end up with a “quarter” beef.

One side provides you with; one hind quarter (the round), one front quarter (the chuck), one flank, one tenderloin and one complete rib. Our price for one hanging side is based on the hanging weight.  That price per pound  is currently $5.25. Obviously, a 200 lb. side would cost you 200 x the price per pound (hanging weight).

Cost to custom cut and wrap or vacuum pack into retail cuts is additional. Currently you can figure on 90 cents for freezer wrap and $1.15 for vacuum packing (per pound.).  It is important to remember that if you request mostly boneless cuts you may lose up to 30% of the total weight.

The abattoir you select will provide you with a cut sheet so you can specify how you would like your meat cut. Also; from our experience, we can  provide you with a description of the cut options and we will gladly go over these options with you over the phone to help meet your family’s needs. You will specify the types and size of roasts (bone in or boneless) you prefer. Whether you want your hamburger in 1, 2 or 3 lb packages or some of each. You will choose between having your tenderloin cut into filet mignon accompanied by New York strips or leave the tenderloin in and cut T-bones and Delmonico steaks. Will you want standing rib roasts or rib steaks or some of each? Will you want sirloin steaks and flank steaks or would you prefer to have it ground to make terrific hamburger? Stew meat, liver, brisket and even dog bones – these are all choices we will be happy to help you with.

CALL NOW WITH QUESTIONS AND ORDERS
903-629-3034

Falster Farm A2A2 Beef Primal Cuts

Lets Review, there three components that make flavorful tender beef:

60% is GENETICS, 30% is the FARMING PRACTICE, and 10% is ANIMAL HANDLING in the final 24 hours before slaughter.You now know more than 99% of the buying public, including the big on-line marketers of beef.

Tender and Flavorful, the Classic Hereford Steer and Angus are our delights.

Get a Quote From Falster Farm

So, let’s discuss the cuts of beef selection possibilities for your beeve.

Once the beeve is humanly dispatched it is cleaned and hangs in the chiller for a number of days. At our local USDA inspected abattoir in Mineola, Texas it may be as: Fresh, as few as 7 days, on average 10 days, and on special occasions 21 days. 

The carcass is allowed to rest in very carefully controlled conditions (cool temperatures, with relatively high humidity) for a period of time—occasionally several weeks.

Under such conditions, we allow enzymes to do their work inside the meat. Results are that we end up with a complexity of flavor — that just wasn’t there before. This increases the nutrient density and frankly, there’s no cooking method that can generate the depth of flavor of an aged piece of meat.

What happens is that enzymes in the meat’s muscle cells begin to break down the meat’s proteins, fats, and glycogen—a carbohydrate—into amino acids, fatty acids, and sugars. One amino acid generated by dry-aging—the most important and flavorful one, in fact—is glutamate.

Then the carcass is ready to cut into divisions of “Cuts” — in our discussion we are looking at the Eight (8) “Primal Cuts of a beef”.

Here we see the interior of the carcass cut into the 8 traditional butcher cuts.

However the Primals can be further subdivided into Specialty Primals as shown here:

Primal beef cuts.

The Chuck: 1 and 2 is about 25% — The Rib: 3 is about 9% — The Loin:4 is about 19% — The Short Loin: 5 — The Rump: 6 is about 4% — The Round: 7 is about 24% — The Brisket: 8 is about 4% — The Plate: 9 is about 7% — The Flank: 10 is about 5% — The Front Shank: 11 is about 3%, The Hind Shank: 12 — is about 3%.

Now our carcass is ready to be further subdivided into “Retail Cuts”:

Still doing it the Old Way – Hand carved.

After we have the Primal Cuts of a beef, which are generally cut by knives and meat saw, we will further cut and scrape to the specification of the customer’s desired thickness and weight.

Hand Cut and using a band saw to make “Retail Cuts.”

This is accomplished using the band saw and a hand scraper.

In our Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ Falling Star beef brand beef, every attention is given to perfection.We recommend 1.5 to 2 inch steaks for best size to choose. At Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ the thickness of our Grass Raised and Clover Finished steak is not just about portion control. Without an adequately thick steak, it’s very difficult to get that perfect contrast between “exterior firm” and interior “melt in your mouth” goodness. Very thin steaks will tend to overcook before they can finish developing a nice crust, even over the hottest fire you can build. Using a thicker steak will help you maintain more of that perfectly cooked interior during the searing process.
This does mean that each steak ends up weighing between 12 ounces and a pound—that’s big, even for someone with a healthy appetite for red meat. But remember this: It’s better to cook one large steak for every two people than to cook two smaller steaks. Learn how to share.

One of the things that makes Falster Farm so different is that we oversee the process assuring our customer that:

  1. They get their meat that we delivered for them to the abattoir, and
  2. We are small enough to offer flexibility in all facets of the breeding, rearing, finishing and processing of a truly gourmet cut of beef.

Not so Chicken Little – Part 1

All Natural Raising of meat birds (chickens) was a long time desire for my dear mother Reba Sue Bockman (she remaried after my daddy’s death. She used to tell me of a French TV Program that she saw where the French farmers raised their meat chickens on open pasture. I can recall setting at her breakfast table laughing about how to make it happen: did they round um up every evening to keep the coyote off; did they have a fence around them – you know, how did they do that? A few chickens out on pasture was one thing, but hundreds; now that posed a challenge to my thinking and design mind.

It was not until I married my long tall Texas redhead Nancy Gail that we really got serious about raising those open range meat chickens . . . enjoyed that taste so good and are so healthy for me. Yes there is a constant battle with the preditors, but the results of our success are noticeable in this here short clip . . . FALSTER FARM Red Ranger Broilers raised on pasture, finished on clover!

watch?v=TbqyAemRlno&feature=colike

If you listen real close you can hear one of our Red Wattle hogs grunt in the background as it enjoys the rich clover as well. Raising livestock this way enriches their life experience and builds our soils to a self sustaining fertility level.

Next time we will discuss the power of Bio Dynamic choices in our farming practice.

Falster Farm Mud Oven Project

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In building this prototype mud oven I (Bo Frick of Sweden) have basically been following the excellent instructions by Kiko Denzer in his “Build your own earth oven” book.

This oven is being built on wheels, to enable Falster Farm to show it in burning action at different markets, baking artisan breads, pizzas and all manner of gourmet foods.

I will here give you a resumé of the building process.

Step 1: Making a concrete slab and running two iron bars through it, this to enable future movement of the oven on and off the trailer. The slab was poured onto a round piece of plywood with a 5″ tall ring of wood, securing the slab. Chicken wire was added as reinforcement.
Step 2: Building a stonewall base that will house empty wine and beer bottles which will capture heat and hold it in suspension for the baking.

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The stones are layered with a lime mortar consisting of ¼ lime and ¾ play sand. The reason for not using concrete is that it doesn’t breathe. The lime/sand mortar becomes rock hard but allows the moisture to travel in and out of the oven, releasing the construction of stress.

 

 

Step 3: Insulating the core of the base.

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Clay was mixed with sand and sawdust producing a mushy

 

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mixture that, after drying; was light and an air-holding insulation material, with the bottles in it.

Step 4: Brick baking floor and the opening arch of the oven in place. 

 

 

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020314_1738_WOOFERMUDOV4.jpgStep 5: Making play sand “casting dome” that the clay layers will be resting against until completed when the sand is removed, creating the oven cavity.
Step 6: Laying the first dense clay layer that will exposed to the actual fire. This process had to be redone with cleaner clay, creating the right texture. The clay was mixed with sand and water and worked in a mixer.


Who said clay wasn’t fun!?

Step 7: Top plaster is applied of a clay/straw/water combination.

 

2012 - December 003 Step 8: The sand mold is removed leaving the Oven in a good smooth interior condition. It is much like the lost sand casting method. The moist sand once holds the clay “cob” in shape until such time as it is set-up. Then the sand is scooped out leaving the fire chamber.

 

oven_finished   The sand is all out now, a visual inspection assures the integrity of the fire chamber.

 

 

 

Step 9: Fire in the hole!
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The oven is being dried slowly with multiple small fires, this to minimize the amount and size of cracks.

Building the Clay Oven was fun and very fulfilling. When I get back home to Sweden, I will be using theis and so much more of what I have learned on Falster Farm in my business and farming ventures – new adventures!