Mini Jersey Bull – KNF BENNETT ORLANO

bennett_offeringDisplayed here for Pedigree and to purchase Frozen Semen purposes only: American Jersey Association.

Contact: Nancy 903.629.3034
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Calved 28 APR 2010 on Falster Farm by Artifical Insemination of  D Cornor Orlando and KNF standard pure bred Jersey POLLY. He stands 44″ at the hip. Dark coloring makes him most attractive. Geneticly docile.

Historical Notes on his background.

4/12/14 Sold to Dariy in CO for $5,000. Sorry I did.
4/7/14 CHAMPION for Fertility Testing $40 and Collection of 293 Straws on 1st pull. Quitman Animal for Trichonas Tests and health papers $86.00
1/15/14 Moved to the Lewis Place. He remains very easy handeling. He helped me catch up ARGYLE BARNEY for transportation. Finest bull to work with we have on the place.
11NOV11 Recieved the Herseys and the Jerseys to breed
1OCT11 Returned from Harris.
Rented to Andy & Rachell Harris to cover their three cows.
May 30, 2011 first live cover of Katherine Cow. He is very stable and intellegent. He lead the bull calves back and forth from the corrals to the

What do I look for in a herd bull . . . ?

111515_1507_ForSaleFals2.pngI believe that many breeders make the mistake of thinking that every bull calf born out of good parents will make a quality herd sire. That swapping their bull calf for another’s bull calf will fix or ensure genetic diversity. Make no mistake about it; there are a lot of other characteristics to consider when choosing a prospective herd sire than just having a different bull. Falster Farm doesn’t select our Mini Bull herd sires on their draw in show ring or if someone will trade us their bull calf for one of ours. After the show ring, most animals are unfit for real ranch and a farm breeding life, not by genetics necessarily, but by rearing on high powered forced gains by grain! Fact: he will be short lived, short winded, and if taken off grain, a serious loss of virility ensues. Same for the female show cow. Show animals are a great way to downgrade your herd’s virility and sustainability (proven in my experience.)

Let’s Look um Over . . . What should you look for?

First place to look: A Breeders Reputation is the basis of our cattle ranching heritage. It’s your 1st assurance of quality, and ethics of the breeder, you should consider his guarantees – if any. The STUD BOOK of any registry is only reliable if the governing membership enforces the rules of the organization, and the members adhere

America's #1 Pasture Monthly.
Falster featured in America’s #1 Pasture Monthly.

to those standards. Now, I’m going to make a course statement in a minute about show cattle but it wasn’t always a case of grain fed stock vs. pature finished beef as the driving force for the associations. Be that as it may, the breed association is the basis for the quality and reliability of the pure bred seed stock.

Disposition is a very important trait that I look for. Ninety-nine percent of the time, if the mother cow has a good disposition, so will the calf. I won’t even consider a calf for a herd sire if he is constantly bouncing off the fence and

Horn Weights
Buyers looking over Horn Weights on yearling Mini Hereford Bull KNF CIBOLO

trying to crawl under the gate every time he is brought into the corral pens. Besides that, his mother won’t stay long with that kind of attitude (thus the importance of data base selection records.) My Herd Bulls are not to be feared, but, respected and enjoyed. Even though they are short (just tipping the end of the ear), I train the horns to curve down, they are powerful animals, and they must to have a good disposition. Again, disposition is bred into an animal and is a very important trait when choosing a herd sire prospect. If you can’t work with him, he can hurt you and your stock.

Masculine traits are very important. I want a bull calf that looks like a bull calf and acts like a bull calf. I want to look in his face and know I am looking at a bull. As I observe him out in the pasture, I want to see him following after cows that are in heat. I want to see him butting heads with other calves and

Mini Bull Yearling PRINCE RUPERT
Yearling Mini Bull PRINCE RUPERT

generally acting like a young boy. It’s just like watching boys grow up. They are rolling around, getting dirty, and acting tough and chasing girls even though at the time they wouldn’t know what to do if they caught one. These are early masculine traits that can be observed and noted at an early age. They must be there if he is to be a working Herd Bull. AND here’s one reason why: I’ve had more than one big Brangus bull jump over our fence and try to breed a miniature cow in heat. The herd bull must protect / defend his herd from intruders as well as service them. This is a must with me. I’ve had my bull Dagmar hold off three different bulls over a three year period . . . once he went two days sparing with a Beef Master before I knew the brute was in our pasture. Dagmar’s face was looking like a beaten prize fighter but his momma cows were not damaged, and he healed up soon enough. His get are with us today, and we love um. The winners are seed stock, the loosers taste great. Both have the very best life that can be had living on the land with excellent pasyurage and clean water and minerals.

Physical Conformation too; a good disposition, masculine traits, and a good sire and dam are things you would want in a herd sire prospect of any breed. When I look for a Miniature Registered Hereford or Mini Jersey herd sire prospect, I look for the traits that made our cattle what they are. An overall view of this calf would show me a clean underline with a tight sheath and navel. The testicular development would be normal and adequate with both testicles down and of equal size. A straight top line, adequate length, beefy broad hips, but not overly muscled, small to medium ears and showing good horn growth for his age. I want to see a calf that is healthy and his general appearance is attractive. I’m looking for length of loin and a medium and balanced skeletal structure. A youngster < 14 months will not have the big neck, but the hair should show curly density and the scrotal sac should too. An 18 month old prospect should be showing size in the neck and very curly neck and forehead hair. His sack should look like a ping pong paddle when viewed from the rear. The older he gets the more distance from the body (heat) it should descend. 

From conception to birth and from weaning to yearling, he is a herd sire prospect. But, somewhere along the way, I have to make a decision. Do I have a bull that represents the Miniature Hereford or Jersey breed of cattle and can he pass on the traditional traits to future generations? Is he going to fulfill the breeding plan of our Falster farm? Do I like him? Does my wife want to keep him? Her sense of judgment is very intuitive and I rely on it to “feel” things that are relationship orientated, feelings that I often over look.

My grandpa taught me that the bull was ½ the value of the entire herd. I won’t tell you that story here, but; I’ve learned to be very critical when it comes to choosing herd sire prospects. Unless a bull calf surpasses his sire, that bull ought to be in a pet steer or on some discriminating dining table. A quality herd sire is an expensive, but the most important investment you can make in the cattle business. Anytime you breed undesirable traits you are multiplying those bad traits many times over and polluting future generations. One year of poorly selected breeding can take several years to correct.

Using these guidelines, I, and you will have chosen consistently excellent herd sire prospects. I will closely observe him through weaning and on to breeding age. He will be weighed at weaning and at yearling age. His scrotal measurements will be taken and recorded. At breeding age he will he bred to a good set of heifers, and his production record will have begun. Hopefully, I have made the right choice, and I will have a great Miniature Hereford herd sire.

Karl Emmett Falster, Sr.

Capt. Karl is a lifelong student of Southern Agricultural principals of small family farm sustainability. He and his wife Nancy own and farm Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ in Wood County Texas. He reguarly does consultation services. A former United States Marine, Falster is the CEO of a non-profit organization that teaches Veterans to Farm: WARRIORS THAT FARM®

The Homestead Cow

The Family Cow Development

Most of the customers that come to Falster Farm are looking for a cow that they can work with in the development of their own small  – family farm. Sustainability is a aspect of their desire although often subliminal. At the turn of the century we started developing the Hersey Line of cross bred cows: Jersey Cow bred by a Mini Hereford Bull.

The project has come into bloom now and we have a enough calves on the ground in the 3rd generation to get a look at what the effect will be:

If you are looking for a dual purpose breed these charming mid size to mini cows may be your answer.
Perhaps if you have a question I could answer it in another Post. Ask away my friend.

Sharing the Falster’s Farm Table

Sharing is Farm Caring – Sustainable Farming at its core.

Visitors to our Sustainable Farm in East Texas will frequently set at our dining room table. Of course we share our meals, planning session, entertain prospective buyers of our mini cattle, gourmet beef, gourmet pork and poultry – all raised on pasture and most of them finished on clover at our table .  .  . Folks get to know their farmer in no better way.

When we set down together, our visitors are impressed by the uniqueness of the table top – it is covered with paintings of our most beloved animals from the past:

buyers - consultationThis Canadian couple came to partake of our On-Farm-Consulting Services. Our Bio-Dynamic farming practices attract folks from all over the country and numerous visitors on the WWOOF program. Here is a good view of our table depicting several of our animal friends. Animal welfare is a big component of our farm/ranch. Our mini Hereford beef cattle, mini Jersey dairy cows, pigs, chickens and ducks, are all treated with respect and live in as low stress environment as can possibly be provided.

On our table or board we can see our Coat of Arms center stage, and each place has a painting of one of our beloved animal friends (personalities) of past years.

 My Current Falster Coat of Arms:

In the center of the table is the Farmer Falster version of my family coat of arms – the Ancient Arms of Falster as we know it is the gold chevrons below the lion in red.

Table Falster Coat of Arms
The Warrior Farmer Falster Coat of Arms

Now, in heraldry the custom was to treat/make a depiction of a man’s honor in battle on a emblazoned crest or shied – a standard.

In my personal life history: After serving in combat in Viet Nam as a US Marine (Scout Warrior with 1/!), awarded several medals for valor, I started a franchise company called Falster Knives – thus the sword.

My people come from a Danish Island named Falster Island – thus the Viking Helm.

Our efforts at farming here in Texas respect the values of the past in order to preserve the prospects of the future – thus the Valhalla type style in the lettering.

Let’s look now at those animals we honor on this broad board:

Table Falster - Paint Horse KNF FOLGER
FOLGER – One Hot Cup of Coffee under saddle

Falster’s Paint Cow Pony FOLGER:

FOLGER and his ½ brother RAZ-MA-TAZ served as my cow horses and saddle mount in reenactment parades around South Texas for many years. FOLGER is a two blue eyed registered paint gelding. He is Nancy’s horse and wants to do more work than we have for him to do now.

I say that because of the injuries I have to my bones and joins over the years of rough cowboy work on the farm.

To offset that loss of flexibility, we tried to find a suitable working dog. that would afford good companion as well as herding style.

Table Falster American Farm Collie BELL
American Farm Collie BELL

The most beautiful dog to possess those attributes was our American Farm Collie – BELLE.

Willie has put in a good day's work
Border Collie KNF WILFORD von FALSTER “Willie”

She was everything one could want in a slow moving working dog, including a loving and respectful family dog. Like RAZ-MA-TAZ she has gone on to be with the Creator, and we have her replacement with us today: KNF WOLFORD VON FALSTER – our pure blood Border Collie “Willie” shown here resting after a hard day’s work herding cows out to their Summer quarters. He is assertive almost beyond compare and lives to be at my side, or on a long outreach to fetch up our mini cattle, pigs, chickens, ducks or any thing I send him to fetch..

So what are these cows that need herding?

At the Master’s end of the table resides a portrait of the world renowned miniature Hereford herd sire KNF CIBOLO.

Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO
Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO

At my Ladies end of the board sets Nancy Gail Faster and her place s held by very 1st dairy cow and the foundation of our mini Jersey dairy line – her name was ANNAKNF ANNE.

ANNA was the most theatrical cow one could ever meet. There simply is not enough space in this missive to tell all the tails that come to mind with most of these creatures, but ANNA is perhaps to most cunning, and comical of the lot.

Of course we have had goats, and lots of them of several wonderful breeds but the smartest and most charming was a cross between a Lamancha and a Pigmy Goat – named Bar-B-Que. BARBE was a show goat – not a powder puff show goat but a showboat show goat that loved to travel – especially to the “old folks” homes around San Antonio.

Pigmy Goat "BAR B QUE"
Pigmy Goat “BAR B QUE”

On the farm Barbie was a rough and tumble little fella trying to hold his own amongst a large company of larger animals.

But upon entering the foyer of a building he became the persona of a gentleman goat. Riding up and down the elevator, waiting respectfully outside the patient’s room, jumping up on their bed when called – you name it, that goat could do it!

Gustav the Barn Cat
The Lion at Falster Farm – Miss Col. Gustav Hoffman

Well Now, what farm would be complete without a dynamic barn cat – Col. Gustav Hoffman. I was the Commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp in New Braunfels, Texas at the time Nancy came home with this little kitten she had picked up on a street corner, downtown San Antonio. A 16 -17 year old intern (Kenny Morris) with us at the time identified the kitten’s sex as a male, stating emphatically, “I know these things.” Thus the name. A month or two later, he was to taken and be “fixed”, but he turned out to be a he! The moniker took and she is Gustav to this day.

 

One of our many Ducks
Duc Duck

DUC DUCK is just one of the numerous ducks we have enjoyed over the years – this on lived (by dodging the coyotes, raccoons, opossums and the like) much longer than any other duck we have had. Each evening her would come up from the pond and sleep with the pigs. I think they enjoyed his company a good bit. Then come morning, he’d waddle back out to the pasture and eat grass, then go take a dip in the pond. What a wonderful life.

Bared Roak Rooster
Bared Rock Rooster  Stone Wall Jackson

 

STONEWALL JACKSON was Nancy’s pet rooster – a barred rock that would follow her around the farm and jump up and set on her arm chair. When she prayed out loud – at the conclusion of evoking the Deity, STONWALL would crow a joyous AMEN.

Honestly, with wonderful farm animals like these, we want to celebrate their remembrances as parts in our lives.

At times, when I travel by a factory farm I wonder if the corporate officers of that place give a damn or not about their livestock crammed in those small pens, packed on that feed lot. When I think of the shallowness of the farmers raising genetically modified malnourishing grains, I wonder if they knowingly care that what they are doing is destroying our earth, our farms, our farm animals, our families, our friends.

Well, here is my last offering, the beautiful little artist that painted these magnificent creatures for Falster Farm – Mrs. York Midge Iguchie.

The Artist on Falster Farm
Marge Iguchie – The Artist in our lives

 

Fini – Karl E. Falster, Sr.