Falster Farm A2A2 Beef Primal Cuts

Lets Review, there three components that make flavorful tender beef:

60% is GENETICS, 30% is the FARMING PRACTICE, and 10% is ANIMAL HANDLING in the final 24 hours before slaughter.You now know more than 99% of the buying public, including the big on-line marketers of beef.

Tender and Flavorful, the Classic Hereford Steer and Angus are our delights.

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So, let’s discuss the cuts of beef selection possibilities for your beeve.

Once the beeve is humanly dispatched it is cleaned and hangs in the chiller for a number of days. At our local USDA inspected abattoir in Mineola, Texas it may be as: Fresh, as few as 7 days, on average 10 days, and on special occasions 21 days. 

The carcass is allowed to rest in very carefully controlled conditions (cool temperatures, with relatively high humidity) for a period of time—occasionally several weeks.

Under such conditions, we allow enzymes to do their work inside the meat. Results are that we end up with a complexity of flavor — that just wasn’t there before. This increases the nutrient density and frankly, there’s no cooking method that can generate the depth of flavor of an aged piece of meat.

What happens is that enzymes in the meat’s muscle cells begin to break down the meat’s proteins, fats, and glycogen—a carbohydrate—into amino acids, fatty acids, and sugars. One amino acid generated by dry-aging—the most important and flavorful one, in fact—is glutamate.

Then the carcass is ready to cut into divisions of “Cuts” — in our discussion we are looking at the Eight (8) “Primal Cuts of a beef”.

Here we see the interior of the carcass cut into the 8 traditional butcher cuts.

However the Primals can be further subdivided into Specialty Primals as shown here:

Primal beef cuts.

The Chuck: 1 and 2 is about 25% — The Rib: 3 is about 9% — The Loin:4 is about 19% — The Short Loin: 5 — The Rump: 6 is about 4% — The Round: 7 is about 24% — The Brisket: 8 is about 4% — The Plate: 9 is about 7% — The Flank: 10 is about 5% — The Front Shank: 11 is about 3%, The Hind Shank: 12 — is about 3%.

Now our carcass is ready to be further subdivided into “Retail Cuts”:

Still doing it the Old Way – Hand carved.

After we have the Primal Cuts of a beef, which are generally cut by knives and meat saw, we will further cut and scrape to the specification of the customer’s desired thickness and weight.

Hand Cut and using a band saw to make “Retail Cuts.”

This is accomplished using the band saw and a hand scraper.

In our Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ Falling Star beef brand beef, every attention is given to perfection.We recommend 1.5 to 2 inch steaks for best size to choose. At Falster Farm on Pasture 365™ the thickness of our Grass Raised and Clover Finished steak is not just about portion control. Without an adequately thick steak, it’s very difficult to get that perfect contrast between “exterior firm” and interior “melt in your mouth” goodness. Very thin steaks will tend to overcook before they can finish developing a nice crust, even over the hottest fire you can build. Using a thicker steak will help you maintain more of that perfectly cooked interior during the searing process.
This does mean that each steak ends up weighing between 12 ounces and a pound—that’s big, even for someone with a healthy appetite for red meat. But remember this: It’s better to cook one large steak for every two people than to cook two smaller steaks. Learn how to share.

One of the things that makes Falster Farm so different is that we oversee the process assuring our customer that:

  1. They get their meat that we delivered for them to the abattoir, and
  2. We are small enough to offer flexibility in all facets of the breeding, rearing, finishing and processing of a truly gourmet cut of beef.

Mini Jersey Bull – KNF BENNETT ORLANO

bennett_offeringDisplayed here for Pedigree and to purchase Frozen Semen purposes only: American Jersey Association.

Contact: Nancy 903.629.3034
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Jump to: Frozen Semen Offer

Calved 28 APR 2010 on Falster Farm by Artifical Insemination of  D Cornor Orlando and KNF standard pure bred Jersey POLLY. He stands 44″ at the hip. Dark coloring makes him most attractive. Geneticly docile.

Historical Notes on his background.

4/12/14 Sold to Dariy in CO for $5,000. Sorry I did.
4/7/14 CHAMPION for Fertility Testing $40 and Collection of 293 Straws on 1st pull. Quitman Animal for Trichonas Tests and health papers $86.00
1/15/14 Moved to the Lewis Place. He remains very easy handeling. He helped me catch up ARGYLE BARNEY for transportation. Finest bull to work with we have on the place.
11NOV11 Recieved the Herseys and the Jerseys to breed
1OCT11 Returned from Harris.
Rented to Andy & Rachell Harris to cover their three cows.
May 30, 2011 first live cover of Katherine Cow. He is very stable and intellegent. He lead the bull calves back and forth from the corrals to the

Sharing the Falster’s Farm Table

Sharing is Farm Caring – Sustainable Farming at its core.

Visitors to our Sustainable Farm in East Texas will frequently set at our dining room table. Of course we share our meals, planning session, entertain prospective buyers of our mini cattle, gourmet beef, gourmet pork and poultry – all raised on pasture and most of them finished on clover at our table .  .  . Folks get to know their farmer in no better way.

When we set down together, our visitors are impressed by the uniqueness of the table top – it is covered with paintings of our most beloved animals from the past:

buyers - consultationThis Canadian couple came to partake of our On-Farm-Consulting Services. Our Bio-Dynamic farming practices attract folks from all over the country and numerous visitors on the WWOOF program. Here is a good view of our table depicting several of our animal friends. Animal welfare is a big component of our farm/ranch. Our mini Hereford beef cattle, mini Jersey dairy cows, pigs, chickens and ducks, are all treated with respect and live in as low stress environment as can possibly be provided.

On our table or board we can see our Coat of Arms center stage, and each place has a painting of one of our beloved animal friends (personalities) of past years.

 My Current Falster Coat of Arms:

In the center of the table is the Farmer Falster version of my family coat of arms – the Ancient Arms of Falster as we know it is the gold chevrons below the lion in red.

Table Falster Coat of Arms
The Warrior Farmer Falster Coat of Arms

Now, in heraldry the custom was to treat/make a depiction of a man’s honor in battle on a emblazoned crest or shied – a standard.

In my personal life history: After serving in combat in Viet Nam as a US Marine (Scout Warrior with 1/!), awarded several medals for valor, I started a franchise company called Falster Knives – thus the sword.

My people come from a Danish Island named Falster Island – thus the Viking Helm.

Our efforts at farming here in Texas respect the values of the past in order to preserve the prospects of the future – thus the Valhalla type style in the lettering.

Let’s look now at those animals we honor on this broad board:

Table Falster - Paint Horse KNF FOLGER
FOLGER – One Hot Cup of Coffee under saddle

Falster’s Paint Cow Pony FOLGER:

FOLGER and his ½ brother RAZ-MA-TAZ served as my cow horses and saddle mount in reenactment parades around South Texas for many years. FOLGER is a two blue eyed registered paint gelding. He is Nancy’s horse and wants to do more work than we have for him to do now.

I say that because of the injuries I have to my bones and joins over the years of rough cowboy work on the farm.

To offset that loss of flexibility, we tried to find a suitable working dog. that would afford good companion as well as herding style.

Table Falster American Farm Collie BELL
American Farm Collie BELL

The most beautiful dog to possess those attributes was our American Farm Collie – BELLE.

Willie has put in a good day's work
Border Collie KNF WILFORD von FALSTER “Willie”

She was everything one could want in a slow moving working dog, including a loving and respectful family dog. Like RAZ-MA-TAZ she has gone on to be with the Creator, and we have her replacement with us today: KNF WOLFORD VON FALSTER – our pure blood Border Collie “Willie” shown here resting after a hard day’s work herding cows out to their Summer quarters. He is assertive almost beyond compare and lives to be at my side, or on a long outreach to fetch up our mini cattle, pigs, chickens, ducks or any thing I send him to fetch..

So what are these cows that need herding?

At the Master’s end of the table resides a portrait of the world renowned miniature Hereford herd sire KNF CIBOLO.

Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO
Miniature Herd Sire KNF CIBOLO

At my Ladies end of the board sets Nancy Gail Faster and her place s held by very 1st dairy cow and the foundation of our mini Jersey dairy line – her name was ANNAKNF ANNE.

ANNA was the most theatrical cow one could ever meet. There simply is not enough space in this missive to tell all the tails that come to mind with most of these creatures, but ANNA is perhaps to most cunning, and comical of the lot.

Of course we have had goats, and lots of them of several wonderful breeds but the smartest and most charming was a cross between a Lamancha and a Pigmy Goat – named Bar-B-Que. BARBE was a show goat – not a powder puff show goat but a showboat show goat that loved to travel – especially to the “old folks” homes around San Antonio.

Pigmy Goat "BAR B QUE"
Pigmy Goat “BAR B QUE”

On the farm Barbie was a rough and tumble little fella trying to hold his own amongst a large company of larger animals.

But upon entering the foyer of a building he became the persona of a gentleman goat. Riding up and down the elevator, waiting respectfully outside the patient’s room, jumping up on their bed when called – you name it, that goat could do it!

Gustav the Barn Cat
The Lion at Falster Farm – Miss Col. Gustav Hoffman

Well Now, what farm would be complete without a dynamic barn cat – Col. Gustav Hoffman. I was the Commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp in New Braunfels, Texas at the time Nancy came home with this little kitten she had picked up on a street corner, downtown San Antonio. A 16 -17 year old intern (Kenny Morris) with us at the time identified the kitten’s sex as a male, stating emphatically, “I know these things.” Thus the name. A month or two later, he was to taken and be “fixed”, but he turned out to be a he! The moniker took and she is Gustav to this day.

 

One of our many Ducks
Duc Duck

DUC DUCK is just one of the numerous ducks we have enjoyed over the years – this on lived (by dodging the coyotes, raccoons, opossums and the like) much longer than any other duck we have had. Each evening her would come up from the pond and sleep with the pigs. I think they enjoyed his company a good bit. Then come morning, he’d waddle back out to the pasture and eat grass, then go take a dip in the pond. What a wonderful life.

Bared Roak Rooster
Bared Rock Rooster  Stone Wall Jackson

 

STONEWALL JACKSON was Nancy’s pet rooster – a barred rock that would follow her around the farm and jump up and set on her arm chair. When she prayed out loud – at the conclusion of evoking the Deity, STONWALL would crow a joyous AMEN.

Honestly, with wonderful farm animals like these, we want to celebrate their remembrances as parts in our lives.

At times, when I travel by a factory farm I wonder if the corporate officers of that place give a damn or not about their livestock crammed in those small pens, packed on that feed lot. When I think of the shallowness of the farmers raising genetically modified malnourishing grains, I wonder if they knowingly care that what they are doing is destroying our earth, our farms, our farm animals, our families, our friends.

Well, here is my last offering, the beautiful little artist that painted these magnificent creatures for Falster Farm – Mrs. York Midge Iguchie.

The Artist on Falster Farm
Marge Iguchie – The Artist in our lives

 

Fini – Karl E. Falster, Sr.

 

2013 ORGANIC INTERNS ARRIVING

Brage (Bo) Frick of Sweden

As we ended 2012 and started 2013 we have started several projects by the advent and aid of interns and WOOFERS literally from around the world.

1st project is a clay baking oven that was built by Brage (Bo) Frick of Sweden. You can view his project details at: Bo’s Clay Oven.

This hand built clay oven yields marvelous artisanal breads and pizza as well as cooks full meals in a fraction of the time – with such flavor that must be tasted to fully appreciate.

Built from scratch, we plan to have the oven in service at the Winnsboro Farmers Market this Spring in the Winnsboro City Park. In addition to the building of Bo’s Oven he has be an assistant to Chef Nancy on several special chef jobs in East Texas. Bo’s plans are to return to Sweden and enter business for himself as a speciality street-vender in Stockholm.

Bo has a master’s degree in agronomy and has used his time on Falster Farm to actually implement in practice many of the technical theories he learned in university. I believe he discovered that in practice of sustainable agriculture some of the modern notions don’t have much bottom to um. He got to learn how to care and ride a horse as well as build livestock shelters that birth pigs and chickens.

Additionally, he wielded sections of steel and sheet metal on the main barn converting it from a hay barn to a good size shop and headquarters. He exhibits good leadership skills and ran the re-fencing efforts over on the Creed place, a leased property for the Falster Miniature Hereford herd.

 

    Mohamed Jan Jalloh of Free Town Sierra Leon Africa

On Spring break from EARTH University in Costa Rica where he studies for a degree in Agricultural Engineering, Mohamed learned about both diesel and gasoline tractors and how to drive them (even into fence posts.) He too got to burn in some of the class room studies in real time farming, learning about cattle pig and chicken care.

Each individual on Falster Farm gets to work on a project that is somewhat of their design or implementation. For the 1st time we had bailed up 17 2000# rounds of “Inon and Clay” peas as hight protein silage. We need a means of feeding it and our dry hay to the 2012 crop of steers and heifers. Mohamed built a special setup outside the corrals to house the hay and allow the steers and heifers exclusive access to it. Naturally we call this place Mohamed’s hay pen.

He also did a good bit of painting and field fence restoration while with us. He plans on returning to his native West Africa and help local farmers implement sustainable protocols and engineering there.